Connect with us

Entertainment

AMC Orders ‘Mega City Smiths’ Stop-Motion Animated Comedy with Baby Dolls as Grown Up Detectives

Published

on

This week, AMC announced an order for six 30-minute episodes of a new show called Mega City Smiths from Steve Conrad (writer of Wonder and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty) and Stoopid Buddy Stoodios, the animation studio behind Robot Chicken and Crossing Swords. The series will be a stop-motion animated project focusing on two detectives trying to solve a high profile missing persons case in the fictional city of Mega City. Oh, and all the characters will be baby dolls made to look like grown ups. What?!

A lot of network and cable channels are investing their time and money in new animated projects since they’re extremely easy to get off the ground in the age of the coronavirus pandemic. People can work from home without much hassle, and there’s little risk of spreading illness when production is spread out and doesn’t require congregation in the same area. The situation may also be resulting in some off-the-wall animated projects getting greenlit that otherwise might fall by the wayside. It seems like AMC just ordered one of those projects

The official press release for AMC’s order of Mega City Smiths says the story “hinges on an investigation into the mysterious disappearance of fictional metropolis Mega City’s most famous magnate.” Throughout the series, we’ll follow two detectives as they take the case and are forced to “fight against their city’s dangerous corruption, at a high cost to themselves and their families, all in pursuit of a gentler place to call home.” And again, we can’t stress this enough, they’re baby dolls made to look like adults.

This sounds like exactly the kind of weird animated project Stoopid Buddy Studios would produce, but it feels like a surprising direction for someone like Steve Conrad. On top of writing the aforementioned saccharine screenplays, he’s been working on shows like Patriot on Amazon and Perpetual Grace, LTD on Epix. Neither of those shows are anything like what this new project, but maybe that’s the appeal for him. In a statement, Conrad said:

Mega City Smiths is a series about our basic desire to be loved and cared for by our mothers, fathers, our few real friends and the setting we call home. We’re very pleased to have found partners at AMC whose ambition is the same as ours, which is to try and contribute to our era’s collection of remarkable TV.”

What is this show? Maybe it will have more in common with the kind of movies that Conrad has written than it seems at first glance. I just can’t get past the idea of baby dolls being used for the kind of show that Conrad seems to be describing. And the following statement from Dan McDermott, president of programming for AMC Networks’ Entertainment Group and AMC Studios, is only more perplexing. He said:

“Brilliant creator. Iconic characters. Human, dramatic, hilarious storytelling. Unique visuals unlike anything seen on television — these are the components of a great AMC series, and they are vitally present here in Steve’s dazzling work. Mega City Smiths will stand out in this crowded environment and engage viewers of all ages.”

A show that will engage viewers of all ages?! It’s a stop-motion animated series with baby dolls as adult detectives. What’s going on here? Is there something I’m missing? Maybe we just need to wait for a glimpse of the series to get a full grasp on what this project will be, because I just can’t wrap my head around it.

In addition to creating the show, Conrad will serve as showrunner. Meanwhile, Seth Green, John Harvatine IV, Matthew Senreich, Eric Towner and Chris Waters will executive produce for Stoopid Buddy Stoodios, and Jennifer Scher, Jeff Dieter and Tom Glynn will produce. The series, which, once again, uses baby dolls as grown adult characters, is expected to debut on AMC sometime in 2021.

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Entertainment

Supergirl Ending With Season 6

Published

on

By

Supergirl‘s tenure as the resident defender of National City is reaching an unexpectedly early conclusion. The upcoming sixth season of The CW’s superhero series will be its last, TVLine has learned.

Production on Supergirl‘s 20-episode final season is slated to begin later this month; the show’s creative team is already developing storylines. (Click here for a refresher on where things left off in Season 5.)

Melissa Benoist stars as Supergirl‘s titular Kryptonian, leading a cast that includes Chyler Leigh, Katie McGrath, Jesse Rath, Nicole Maines, Andrea Brooks, Azie Tesfai, Julie Gonzalo, Staz Nair and David Harewood. Previous stars included Mehcad Brooks, Jeremy Jordan, Chris Wood, Floriana Lima, Odette Annable and Calista Flockhart.

(Click here for Benoist’s reaction to the show’s conclusion.)

Supergirl‘s freshman run, which premiered in October 2015 on CBS, averaged 7.7 million total viewers and a 1.7 demo rating (in Live+Same Day numbers). Upon being relocated for Season 2, it slipped to a CW-typical 2.4 mil/0.7. With its most recent, fifth season, the Arrowverse series averaged 840,000 total viewers and a 0.22 demo rating, down a good (but not) 30 percent from Season 4.

Supergirl is part of the newly re-minted “CWverse,” meaning it exists in the same universe as Arrow, The Flash, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow, Black Lightning, Batwoman and recent DC Universe transplant Stargirl. New seasons of those shows — except Arrow, of course, which wrapped its eight-season run earlier this year — will premiere on The CW sometime in 2021.

TVLine’s Broadcast-TV Renewal Scorecard has been updated to reflect Supergirl‘s impending conclusion. Are you prepared to say goodbye to your friends (and their enemies) in National City? Drop a comment with your reaction, as well as your hopes for the show’s final season, below.

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Why American Horror Story fans hated Apocalypse’s finale

Published

on

By

Although the bad guy almost always loses on television, fans were expecting a more gratifying death to quite possibly the strongest creature on AHS. Other Reddit users mentioned that Michael’s death is also anticlimactic. The witches go back to his weakest point to kill him as opposed to a fair showdown between Michael and newly minted Supreme Mallory (Billie Lourd). The point is, Michael can’t be beaten at the top of his game, as is the case with most characters who are capable of bringing on the bloody apocalypse. This is why Mallory has to take on a much weaker form of the antichrist. Otherwise, she loses.

Another common complaint is that Apocalypse undid plot lines from previous seasons. As the Redditors collectively pondered, how come the antichrist is still born regardless of everything the witches go through to stop Michael? Doesn’t this undermine everything that happens in Apocalypse?

Outpost 3 teens Emily (Ash Santos) and Timothy (Kyle Allen) also reappear after being off the grid for what seemed like ages. In the new timeline, since the undoing of Michael’s wrath in the apocalyptic world, Emily and Timothy meet up by chance and sire a kid who eventually kills a babysitter. This kid is somehow the new supposed son of Satan. Apparently, their DNA really was special. Alas, the audience is just supposed to accept that these two are capable of making Baby Satan — even though the audience spent an entire season being told how otherworldly powerful Michael is? As usual, the season’s time travel component blurred the already bloody waters of a season that was otherwise great — but could have been so much better. 

Twists and turns are staples of the horror genre. As far as some fans are concerned, however, Ryan Murphy’s aging anthology series may have gone a bit too far with this one.

Continue Reading

Entertainment

‘The Daily Show’ Offers a COVID-Era Staycation As Bad as a Real Airport

Published

on

By

In a fun gag parodying one of the weirder COVID-19-era trends, “The Daily Show” on Tuesday rolled an ad for a new service promising to bring a crucial vacation experience to people still quarantining in their homes. Specifically, the experience of just how much it sucks to deal with airports.

So for those catching up, what inspired the gag was a story about what airlines call “scenic flights” but are being colloquially called “flights to nowhere,” where people buy airline tickets for lengthy flights with no destination. These flights, which are supposedly chock full of COVID-19 safety precautions, actually depart from the airport and then, several hours later, returns all passengers back to their point of departure. The idea is that people can have the experience of taking a vacation without actually taking one and increasing their risk of becoming a pandemic statistic.

You can probably spot a few problems with the idea, but as Roy Wood Jr. noted Tuesday, one of the biggest is that the people are basically boiling a vacation down to the worst part of it — the part involving airports.

In the clip, Wood plays Leo Deblin, whose fictional service, “Leo Deblin’s Airport-at-Home,” which promises to give customers “all the stress, frustration and boredom of flying, in your house.”

Among the amenities offered, Wood’s Deblin promises to “inspect your suitcase, and throw half of it out,” take shampoo away from kids, and serve “the world’s soggiest sandwich,” which of course costs $40.00.

Wood also promises to “take up every outlet, so you can’t charge your phone,” replace Netflix with “CNN on mute,” and return people’s luggage “with a weird wet spot on it,” which he adds “could be blood.”

Watch the whole clip above.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 NewsLagoon | All Content Rights Reserved.