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CS Video: Jena Malone & Jack Huston Talk Horror Thriller Antebellum

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CS Video: Jena Malone & Jack Huston Talk Horror Thriller Antebellum

ComingSoon.net had the opportunity to speak with Antebellum co-stars Jena Malone (Hope, The Hunger Games franchise) and Jack Huston (Kill Your Darlings, Fargo) about the upcoming horror thriller. You can check out the interviews in the player below!

RELATED: Janelle Monáe Has Been Chosen in New Antebellum Trailer

In Antebellum, successful author Veronica Henley (Janelle Monáe) finds herself trapped in a horrifying reality that forces her to confront the past, present and future – before it’s too late. Advocacy filmmakers Gerard Bush + Christopher Renz (Bush | Renz) – best known for their pioneering advertising work engaged in the fight for social justice – write, produce and direct their first feature film, teaming with QC Entertainment, producer of the acclaimed films Get Out and BlacKkKlansman, Zev Foreman, Lezlie Wills, and Lionsgate for the mind-bending new thriller Antebellum.

The film stars Janelle Monáe, Eric Lange, Jena Malone, Jack Huston, Kiersey Clemons, Gabourey Sidibe, Marque Richardson, Robert Aramayo, Lily Cowles, and introducing Tongayi Chirisa. Written and Directed by Gerard Bush & Christopher Renz. Produced by Raymond Mansfield, p.g.a., Sean McKittrick, p.g.a., Zev Foreman, p.g.a., Gerard Bush, Christopher Renz, and Lezlie Wills, p.g.a.

RELATED: Antebellum VOD Release Date Announced, Will Skip Theaters

The movie will premiere as a Premium On-Demand release, debuting on all platforms on September 18. The film will be released theatrically in select international markets.

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The New Royal Baby: What Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank Already Have Planned

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On Friday morning, Buckingham Palace announced that Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank are expecting their first child. The baby, due in early 2021, will be Queen Elizabeth’s ninth great-grandchild, and the first grandchild of Prince Andrew and his ex-wife, Sarah Ferguson. 

Eugenie and Jack will raise their child at Kensington Palace, but despite being born 11th in line for the throne, their firstborn won’t have a title. The couple are said to be thrilled to be expecting their first baby two years after their wedding. Sources close to Jack and Eugenie say that the couple want their child to live an “ordinary life” and have an ordinary name. 

“Even if the Queen offered them a title as a gift, it’s not Eugenie or Jack’s desire for their child to have a title,” said a family friend. “Eugenie knows that a title can be a curse as well as a blessing and she and Jack want their child to live an ordinary life and eventually work to earn a living. Titles really don’t matter to Jack and Eugenie, they just want a happy healthy child.”

They plan to raise their family in Ivy Cottage at Kensington Palace, where they have been living since their October 2018 wedding. “It was intended for them as a family home, and they have no immediate plans to move,” a palace insider tells Vanity Fair.

Despite the good news, the York family is still facing a turbulent time, as Prince Andrew’s former friendship with Jeffrey Epstein continues to make headlines. Andrew stepped down from his duties as a working royal in November 2019, after Epstein’s death and a disastrous BBC interview. Family sources say that because of the media glare, the Yorks are deliberately keeping a low profile.

The July wedding of Eugenie’s sister, Princess Beatrice, to real-estate investor Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi was a low-key and private affair, after being rescheduled twice due to the pandemic. The palace’s official announcements and photographs excluded Andrew and Sarah, though the wedding reception did take place at their home, Royal Lodge, in Windsor, and Andrew did participate in the ceremony at a nearby church. In addition, Andrew will reportedly not be invited to any of the public ceremonies honoring his father, Prince Philip, on his 100th birthday next June.

The palace’s Friday statement announcing the pregnancy did, however, include Eugenie’s parents. It reads: “The Duke of York and Sarah, Duchess of York, Mr. and Mrs. George Brooksbank, The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh are delighted with the news.”

Because royal children take their rank from their fathers, Eugenie’s full title is HRH Princess Eugenie of York. When the couple wed, Jack was offered a title but chose not to take it, so their child won’t automatically be eligible for one. That said, the queen has been known to make exceptions to the rule that only the sons of monarchs and their sons inherit titles. The queen offered her daughter Princess Anne titles for her children, Peter and Zara Philips, when they were born, but the Princess Royal chose not to take them.

The public events surrounding royal births have varied over the last decade. When Prince Harry and Meghan Markle had their son, Archie, his birth was followed by an official photo-call and family portraits. While his christening was held privately, a series of official portraits were released a few days later. For the Queen’s grandchildren without titles, the affairs are much quieter. When Peter Phillips’ daughters, Savannah and Isla, are the queen’s two oldest great-grandchildren, were born in 2010 and 2012 respectively, the palace released statements, but no official photos accompanied them. Their christenings were also private, though the queen was in attendance. When another great-grandchild, Mia Tindall, was christened, the public only saw pictures of the family assembling because an ITV reporter just so happened to be visiting the Gloucestershire village where the ceremony took place.

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Stream It Or Skip It: ‘Just Mercy’ on HBO, an Earnest Legal Drama Brought to Life by Michael B. Jordan and Jamie Foxx

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HBO’s Saturday night movie this week is Just Mercy, a based-on-a-true-story drama about a young, idealistic lawyer’s fight to get an innocent Alabama man off death row in the late 1980s and early ’90s. Michael B. Jordan stars as Bryan Stevenson, a Harvard Law graduate who wrote the bestseller Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, which detailed how he helped acquit Walter McMillian after he was wrongly convicted of murder charges levied against him by racist cops. The book is the foundation of the movie, which debuted in theaters in late 2019, and carries some added dramatic gravitas here in 2020.

JUST MERCY: STREAM IT OR SKIP IT?

The Gist: Monroe County, Alabama, 1987. McMillian (Jamie Foxx), known as Johnnie D. by his friends and family, had just finished a day’s work as a lumberman and was driving home when he came across police barricading the road. Their guns were pointed at him. Months prior, Ronda Morrison was murdered in the small-town laundromat where she worked. An overwhelmingly white jury convicted Johnnie D., a Black man, and gave him a 30-year sentence, which a judge, improbably but appropriately named Robert E. Lee Key, overruled in lieu of the death penalty.

Two years pass. Bryan Stevenson, a whip-smart young Harvard Law grad originally from a poor rural area in Delaware, moves to Monroe County. He teams with legal assistant Eva Ansley (Brie Larson) to help death row inmates who received inadequate legal representation. Jackass cops strip-search Bryan on his first visit to the prison, and maybe it goes without saying that they’re white and he’s Black. He sits down with six inmates, most notably Herb (Rob Morgan), a mentally ill Vietnam War vet who unwittingly killed a girl with a homemade explosive, and Johnnie D., who doesn’t want to go through more inevitably disappointing legal appeals. He turns down Bryan flat.

Bryan wins his soon-to-be client over by visiting his family. “I lived down a dirt road just like that,” he tells Johnnie D. Bryan digs into the case. Johnnie D. is no saint — he was targeted by white cops because he had cheated on his wife with a white woman. But Bryan finds a whole mess of weaknesses in the prosecution. He and Eva trip over and/or hurdle a variety of roadblocks put up by locals as they get their legal ducks in a row. Bryan is pulled over and harassed by cops; Eva endures an anonymous bomb threat against her family.

Meanwhile, Herb’s execution date draws near, and Bryan fights for a stay of execution. They pour over books, dig through files and shake down the primary witness in Johnnie D.’s trial, Ralph Myers (Tim Blake Nelson), a career criminal who appears to have given false testimony in exchange for being moved off death row. Bryan officially opens up the Equal Justice Initiative, with an office and receptionist. Will Bryan and his growing pack of allies navigate this thorny and complicated scenario and save their clients from the electric chair?

JUST MERCY HBO REVIEW
Photo: Everett Collection

What Movies Will It Remind You Of?: Just Mercy has all the elements of decades of legal/courtroom dramas, drawing obvious comparison to To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s no Anatomy of a Murder or Inherit the Wind, but it’ll hold up better than all those cornball John Grisham adaptations from the ’90s. It also wraps in elements from death-row drama Dead Man Walking, and thematic tones from Werner Herzog’s searing anti-capital-punishment documentary Into the Abyss.

Performance Worth Watching: Foxx landed a supporting-actor SAG nom for his performance, which makes the most of his character’s blend of despondency and conviction. But Jordan once again cuts through any of the film’s moderately boilerplate drama with his SINCERITY LASER, which he wielded so effectively in Fruitvale Station and Creed.

Memorable Dialogue: Eva, after police search her home for explosives: “Maybe people will stop trying to kill us once they realize how charming we are.”

Sex and Skin: None.

Our Take: Just Mercy is a rock-solid legal drama whose undeniable earnestness makes up for its lack of frills. Director Destin Daniel Cretton (the extraordinary Short Term 12) tonally situates the film in a comfortable spot between melodrama and procedural, and maintains a calm, steady, firm grip on our interest. He handles intense moments set on death row with appropriate gravitas — a scene in which Foxx’s Johnnie D. steadies Herb during a panic attack is quite moving, and a grueling scene in the execution chamber quietly courses with the passionate subtextual assertion that what we’re seeing is ethically barbaric.

The film steers clear of violent displays, but there’s no way we can avoid the overwhelming discomfort we feel when we see white cops pull over Black men and draw their guns. Such scenes are even more difficult to watch now than they were six months ago, even in a relatively middle-of-the-road movie like Just Mercy (they’re even more disturbing in Queen and Slim). Such is our world now. But Just Mercy is fueled by the real-life Stevenson’s understated charisma, and the film asserts that buoying calm rationalism with strong emotion is prudent in instances of great injustice and cruelty. It carries a simple, but effective message: It’s easy to tell the truth, and it’s very hard to tell a lie.

Our Call: STREAM IT. Just Mercy isn’t a groundbreaking film, but it’s an optimistic one. If you need a little hope and emotional release these days, this movie will give you some.

John Serba is a freelance writer and film critic based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Read more of his work at johnserbaatlarge.com or follow him on Twitter: @johnserba.

Where to stream Just Mercy

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10 Great Animated Movies And TV Shows Centered On Black Characters, While We Wait For Soul

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I don’t know much about West African culture, so I cannot say if the film is a fair, accurate, or flattering portrayal of it. I can say that the film is unique and brings some attention to West African folklore. It’s not a kid-friendly film as all the female characters are nude, as is baby Kirikou, but most of the messages about being kind to others, not judging people by their size, and forgiveness, are all messages that appeal to younger audiences.

Stream it on Amazon Prime here.

The future of Pixar’s Soul is still to-be-determined, but right now it’s still set for a November 20, 2020 release date. Even if it is moved to 2021, hopefully, some of these animated films keep your attention until its release.

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