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Final Fantasy VII Remake Sets Franchise Record, April 2020’s Best-Selling Game

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Final Fantasy VII Remake Sets Franchise Record, April 2020’s Best-Selling Game

Square Enix’s Final Fantasy VII Remake has not only set a new launch month sales record in the Final Fantasy franchise, surpassing 2016’s Final Fantasy XV in unit and dollar sales, but the game title was also April 2020’s best-selling game, according to IGN.

RELATED: CS Review: Final Fantasy VII Remake Proves It Was Worth the Wait

The outlet reports that the title led April 2020 sales, followed by Call of Duty: Modern Warfare and Animal Crossing: New Horizons. Additionally, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare became the 4th fastest-selling release in U.S. tracked history.

April 2020’s Top 20 Best-Selling Games:

1. Final Fantasy VII Remake
2. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare
3. Animal Crossing: New Horizons
4. NBA 2K20
5. Grand Theft Auto V
6. Resident Evil 3
7. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2: Remastered
8. MLB: The Show 20
9. Madden NFL 20
10. Red Dead Redemption II
11. Just Dance 2020
12. FIFA 20
13. Mortal Kombat 11
14. Borderlands 3
15. Predator: Hunting Grounds
16. Mario Kart 8: Deluxe
17. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order
18. Persona 5: Royal
19. Need for Speed: Heat
20. Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot

Grab your copy of the game here!

In Final Fantasy VII Remake, players will be drawn into a world where the Shinra Electric Power Company, a shadowy corporation, controls the planet’s very life force. Cloud Strife, a former member of Shinra’s elite SOLDIER unit now turned mercenary, lends his aid to an anti-Shinra organization calling themselves Avalanche.

The first game in the project is set in the city of Midgar and is a fully standalone gaming experience designed for RPG players that crave unforgettable characters, a powerful story and the ability to choose their style of play with a battle system that merges thrilling real-time action with strategic, command-based combat.

RELATED: CS Recommends: Final Fantasy VII Remake, Plus Toys, Books & More!

The Deluxe Edition contains a hardback art book featuring stunning concept art, a soundtrack selection CD, Summon Materia DLC allowing players to summon Cactuar in-game and a Sephiroth SteelBook Case.

The Digital Deluxe Edition contains a digital artbook, a digital soundtrack selection, and Summon Materia DLC allowing players to summon Carbuncle and Cactuar in-game.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. 

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Keke Palmer Takes on the National Guard: “Sometimes Going Against Authority Is the Only Remedy For Change”

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In the decade it has taken Keke Palmer to transform from beloved child star to Emmy-nominated daytime host, she’s also shown off her flair for rhetoric. Last year, she made Dick Cheney into a meme by simply saying, “Sorry to that man.” On Tuesday, Palmer was protesting in Los Angeles when she pulled off an even more impressive rhetorical feat, in an exchange captured by NBC News’s Gadi Schwartz. When the host approached a handful of National Guardsmen, they had a conversation, and by the end, the guards were practically ready to leave their posts and join the movement.

“You have a president who is talking about the second amendment, saying to use it against the people who are protesting. This is the message that we’re seeing,” she said. “I don’t know if you’re on social media, because the news doesn’t tell you everything. But you have to pay attention to what is going on. We have a president who is trying to incite a race war. We have people here that need your help. This is when y’all stand together with the community, with society, to stop the governmental oppression. Period. We need you, so march with us.”

“I agree,” one guard said in response, before emphasizing that he could only follow the group to the end of the block.

“Let the revolution be televised. Let’s make history. March with us,” she said. “It will send a huge message.”

Ultimately, they didn’t march with the protesters, but they did tell Palmer that they supported her aims before eventually kneeling. Other protesters cheered, but Palmer wasn’t especially impressed. “I don’t know,” she said. “It ain’t enough.”

Later, Palmer shared more of her thoughts about the day on her Instagram. “At 26, I’m looking out and witnessing a physical revolt, and it’s a revolt on a scale that I wasn’t sure I’d ever see,” she said.

“To those that may not be looking close enough, all they will see is looting, or people who don’t really care about the movement, or anarchy without a movement,” she added. “But what I see is a society responding to the oppressor about how the oppressor has responded to us.”

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Vice TV, Arrow Pictures docuseries to examine “D.C. Sniper” case

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Youth-skewing media brand Vice TV is slated to premiere the landmark crime docuseries I, Sniper this June from London-based, high-end factual label Arrow Pictures.

Four years in the making, the eight-part docuseries will provide a minute-by-minute account of the 2002 Washington D.C. sniper case, with unprecedented access to surviving shooter Lee Malvo.

Alongside Gulf War veteran John Muhammad, Malvo terrorized the Washington D.C. region in 2002 through a series of random shootings from inside the trunk of a blue Chevy Caprice. In total, 10 people were killed and three others were injured.

Malvo, who was 17 at the time of the terrorism incident, will examine the conditions that led the teenager to become a mass murderer through a series of phone calls from his supermax cell at Red Onion State Prison in Virginia.

The series will feature previously unreleased interviews with survivors, victims’ families and investigators.

I, Sniper is series directed by Ursula Macfarlane and executive produced by John Smithson and Sam Starbuck. Mary-Jane Mitchell is producer on the series, which is directed by Janice Sutherland. Morgan Hertzan is EVP and GM of Vice TV.

The series is distributed by PBS International.

Vice will launch I, Sniper on June 2 at 10 p.m. ET/PT. The series will be made available across the U.S. on Vice TV via all major satellite and cable providers, vicetv.com, and the Vice TV app.

I, Sniper goes beyond the story we thought we all knew and investigates what led Lee Malvo down his horrific path,” said Hertzan in a statement. “Viewers will be seized by the incredible storytelling in this series and its ability to take you through this series of events like never before.”

“In addition to securing unprecedented access to Lee Malvo, we also undertook extensive interviews with the investigators of the Washington D.C. Sniper case, the survivors and the victims’ families, so that we could view the story from all perspectives, and examine both Malvo’s childhood of deprivation in Jamaica and the murders in forensic detail,” added Arrow Pictures creative director John Smithson. “I, Sniper seeks to understand, not vindicate, and show how and why someone can become a mass murderer, even at the age of just 17.”

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‘13th’ on Netflix and ‘Just Mercy’ on VOD is An Easy Double Feature For a Beginner’s Course on Systemic Racism

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Not everyone is in a position to protest in person or donate large sums of money, but one thing we can all do to support the Black Lives Matter movement—which has reignited following the killing of George Floyd—is educate ourselves on the history of racism within the justice system. Luckily, movies like 13th and Just Mercy have made it super to start your journey. These two films—the former of which is streaming on Netflix and the latter of which is free to rent this week—are a powerful crash course in systemic racism. It’s an educational double feature connected not just by their subject matter, but by activist Bryan Stevenson, founder/executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, and a name you should know if you don’t already.

13th, from director Ava DuVernay, is a 2016 Netflix original documentary that will expertly walk you through how slavery—supposedly abolished by the 13th Amendment to the Constitution—has been carried on in the U.S. through the prison system. There is, astoundingly, a loophole in the text of that amendment: Slavery is illegal now, it says, “except for punishment as a crime.” And so the number of prisoners in the U.S. exploded. As we hear Barack Obama say at the beginning of the film, “the US had 5 percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of the world’s prisoners.”

13th features many activists, politicians, and public figures, and that includes Bryan Stevenson, the central figure of the 2019 legal drama, Just Mercy. In Just Mercy—which is directed by Destin Daniel Cretton and based on Stevenson’s own 2014 memoir—the activist is portrayed in his early years, by Michael B. Jordan. He’s fresh out of Harvard law school and eager to help people accused of crimes who can’t afford representation. He meets Walter “Johnny D.” McMillian (Jamie Foxx), an African-American man wrongly accused of, and sentenced to death for, murdering a white woman. It was the first big case in Stevenson’s long career in criminal justice activism, but certainly not the last. He went on to found the Equal Justice Initiative, a non-profit that provides lawyers to prisoners who may have been wrongly convicted of crimes or not given a fair trial. If you watch 13th on Netflix, you will know that’s a lot of people, and you will also know that a disproportionate number of those people are black.

While Just Mercy shows Stevenson as a young, fresh-face lawyer who looks like Michael B. Jordan (no complaints here), 13th will introduce you to the real deal in the present day. Now 60, Stevenson is still fighting to correct the racist justice system and doing his best to educate Americans on its shameful history. “We make them their crimes,” Stevenson says in the documentary, referring to the disproportionate number of black people behind bars, including those who were falsely accused. “That’s how we introduced them. ‘That’s a rapist, that’s a murderer, that’s a robber, that’s a sex offender, that’s a gang leader.’ And through that lens, it becomes so much easier to accept that they’re guilty and that they should go to prison.”

The story of Stevenson’s fight against systemic racism, both past and present, is a crucial chapter of this national conversation, and Netflix and Warner Bros. have made it all too easy for all of us to brush up on the subject. And once you’ve begun educating yourself, be sure to take the crucial next step: Passing on what you’ve learned to others. That’s how change is born.

Watch 13th on Netflix

Where to stream Just Mercy

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