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FX Renews What We Do In The Shadows For Season 3!

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FX renews What We Do In The Shadows for season 3!

After two highly acclaimed seasons for the cable network, FX has chosen to greenlight a third season of What We Do In The Shadows, the series adaptation of the Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi written/directed mockumentary, according to Deadline.

RELATED: Mark Hamill Shows His Dark Side in What We Do in the Shadows Episode 2.06 Promo

We’re incredibly happy that critics and audiences are all in on Shadows,” Nick Grad, President, Original Programming, FX Entertainment said in a statement. “Week in and week out, the producers, writers, and our amazing cast continue to make one of the funniest and best comedy series on TV.

The renewal comes ahead of the June 10 finale of its second season, with the cable network revealing that the episodes this season are averaging 3.2 million total viewers across linear and digital platforms, including FX on Hulu, in the first six episodes, which marks a 25 percent rise in viewership compared to its first season.

What We Do in the Shadows is based on the 2014 vampire mockumentary film of the same name which follows a group of vampires (Taika Waititi, Clement, Jonathan Brugh, Ben Fransham) who live together in modern-day Wellington, New Zealand as they go through the mundane tasks of everyday life and of rooming with other people, as well as bringing in a vampire (Cori Gonzalez-Macuer) just turned by the group.

Season 2’s official synopsis reads: “Over the course of the season, the vampires will try to find their way in a world of human Super Bowl parties, internet trolls, an energy vampire who gets a promotion and becomes drunk on power and of course, all the ghosts, witches, necromancers, zombies and shadowy cloaked assassins who roam freely in the Tri-State area. Is Guillermo destined to be a vampire or a vampire hunter? Or maybe just a familiar for the rest of his life?”

The series is written and executive-produced by Waititi and Clement. It stars Matt Berry (The IT Crowd), Kayvan Novak (Early Man), Natasia Demetriou (Year Friends) and Harvey Guillen (The Magicians).

Season 2 will also be featuring Star Wars alum Mark Hamill, who is the latest big name that is set to make an appearance in the series with the first season featuring guest-stars that included Dave Bautista, Evan Rachel Wood, Danny Trejo, Wesley Snipes, Paul Rubens, and Tilda Swinton, who all played vampire roles.

RELATED: Reservation Dogs: Taika Waititi to Write and Direct New FX Limited Series

The film earned rave reviews from critics upon release and quickly became an international cult classic, propelling Waititi and Clement even further into the spotlight as actors, writers, and directors. Since its release, the film has had multiple continuations in development, with a sequel set on the group of werewolves seen in the film led by Anton (Rhys Darby, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle) still in active development, as well as a procedural comedy series based on the cops seen in the film as they encounter paranormal events around Wellington.

The 10-episode second season is scheduled to premiere on April 15 on FX and the next day on Hulu. The premiere will include the first two episodes, followed by a new episode each subsequent week.

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‘I Cannot Speak to My People the Way They Need to Be Spoken To’

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Amanda Seales is exiting “The Real.”

In an Instagram Live video this week, the co-host said she has decided not to renew her contract with the daytime talk show. “It doesn’t feel good to my soul to be at a place where I can not speak to my people the way they need to be spoken to,” she said. “And where the people who are speaking to me in disparaging ways, are not being handled.”

The announcement came six months after Seales first joined the roundtable show as a permanent co-host, joining Loni Love, Jeannie Mai, Tamera Mowry and Adrienne Bailon. A spokesperson for the show declined to comment except to confirm Seales’ exit.

“I’m not in a space where I can, as a full black woman, have my voice and my co-workers also have their voices and where the people at the top are not respecting the necessity for black voices to be at the top too,” Seales told actor and producer Brandon Victor Dixon, who joined her for the conversation.

Seales later clarified in a follow-up post that her decision to leave the show did not stem from her relationship with her co-hosts.

“Y’all so f–ing corny,” she said. “There is a whole pandemic and an uprising going on, and you still can’t find s– else to do but try and create some kind of conflict that doesn’t exist? … What I gotta do with my business ain’t got nothing to do with them sisters.”

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Trevor Noah Addresses George Floyd Death, Decries Police ‘Looting Black Bodies’

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In an emotional video message, “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah addressed the systemic racism in the U.S. and the explosion of protests in response to the death of George Floyd.

“Daily Show” is in reruns this week. On Monday, Noah released an 18-minute video discussing the domino effect that the news cycle has had on shining visibility on the deaths and altercations between police and unarmed African Americans.

“I saw so many people online saying, ‘These riots are disgusting, this is not how a society should be run, you do not loot and you do not burn, this is not how our society is built,’” Noah said. “But what is society? When you boil it down, society is a contract we sign as human beings amongst each other. ‘Amongst this group of us, we agree in common rules, common ideals, and common practices that are going to define us as a group.’”

Noah started by highlighting Christian Cooper, a black man in Central Park who asked Amy Cooper, a white woman, to leash her dog, resulting in an altercation in which Cooper threatened to call the police on him to say that an African American man was threatening her life. He then discussed the shooting of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia as another domino that shone a light on the racism present in our country. And then, he said, the video of Floyd’s death on May 25 from asphyxiation — after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes — was the final spark that incited protests held across the country and around the world.

“The video of George Floyd comes out, and I don’t know what made the video more painful for people to watch, the fact that that man was having his life taken in front of our eyes, the fact that we were watching someone being murdered by someone who’s job is to protect and serve, or the fact that he seemed so calm doing it,” said Noah.

“One ray of sunshine for me was seeing how many people instantly condemned [the Floyd video],” he said. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like that. Especially not in America. I haven’t seen a police video come out and just see across the board. I mean, even Fox News commentators and police chiefs from around the country immediately condemning what they saw. No questions, not, ‘What was he doing?’ Just going, ‘No, what happened here was wrong.’”

He then began speaking about the subsequent riots, saying that some people are condemning the looting and fires. He pointed to the reality of our society as being the culprit and epitome of the frustration. The real looting is the police “looting black bodies,” he said.

“We need people at the top to be the most accountable because they are the ones who are basically setting the tone and the tenure for everything we do in society,” said Noah. “The reason that [we lead by example] is because we understand that in society, that if we lead by example, there is a good chance that people will follow that example that you have set. And so if the example law enforcement is setting is that they do not adhere to the laws, then why should the citizens of that society adhere to the laws when in fact the law enforcers the law enforcers themselves don’t.”

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What I’m Watching: With Hank Azaria

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With so many of us social-distancing and staying in, our Watchlists are going to empty out very quickly as we burn through all those “I’ve-been-meaning-to-watch” shows and movies we’ve been saving for a rainy day. To help you find more great content (and some undiscovered gems) to keep you going, we’re turning to the people that make it: the film and TV writers, directors, craftspeople, and performers who, just like you, are stuck home and bingeing like crazy right now.

For our latest installment of “What I’m Watching,” actor Hank Azaria summons a few of his alter-egos from The Simpsons to recommend TV and film titles you should watch while isolating. Azaria may be well known for his Simpsons voices, but his IFC series Brockmire, about a disgraced sportscaster trying to reclaim his career in a small market, offers four seasons of high-scoring comedy (three seasons are rated 100% on the Tomatometer).


 

Comic Book Guy says: “How fitting for Comic Book Guy to recommend The Boys, my favorite superhero retelling, slightly edging out Thor: Ragnarok and Watchmen of recent years. ”

Season 1 Critics Consensus: Though viewers’ mileage may vary, The Boys’ violent delights and willingness to engage in heavy, relevant themes are sure to please those looking for a new group of antiheroes to root for.

Stream now on Amazon Prime Video.  


 

Moe the Bartender says: “There’s certain movies if they’re on, I got to watch, like The Godfather movies and Goodfellas, but there’s only one horrible movie that if it’s on, I gotta watch it, and that’s Road House, baby!”

Critics Consensus: Whether Road House is simply bad or so bad it’s good depends largely on the audience’s fondness for Swayze — and tolerance for violently cheesy action.

Stream now on Vudu (free with ads).  


Policeman Wiggum says: “A cop recommendation: Happy Valley. Best cop show of the last few years. BBC show, Sarah Lancashire stars, brilliant.” (Azaria adds, “It might be my favorite show of the last five years. Amazing show. Underwatched.” He also advises that viewers should watch it with the subtitles on, because of the thick Northern England accent.)

Season 1 Critics Consensus: Dark, edgy, and surprisingly suspenseful, Happy Valley dispenses some of the more oddly liberating violence on television.

Available to purchase on Amazon Prime Video and iTunes.


Professor Frink says: “A recommendation for the kiddies: Lego Masters. Delightful. I watch it with my son. I enjoy the colors and shapes and the cajoink, cajink, cachiving of little pieces fitting together.”

About the Series: Hosted by Will Arnett, the show pits Lego enthusiasts against each other in a competition that starts with a single Lego brick and infinite possibilities and concludes with mind-blowing builds that will surely both inspire legions of loyal Lego followers and capture the imagination of new fans.

Stream now on Hulu.


World Athletics YouTube Channel

Jim Brockmire says: “[I’m] just bereft without sports, so I want to recommend, on YouTube, got the World Athletics mix. On the World Athletics channel, you get the beautiful Olympic track and field events called by great BBC  announcers. I couldn’t have done it better myself. Beats what I’m doing: just wandering around the house, deciding what I would and wouldn’t use as toilet paper.”

About: Official account of World Athletics, formerly the IAAF. Home of all things running, jumping, throwing and walking.

Stream past events now on YouTube. 


Looking for more great shows and movies to binge? Head to Rotten Tomatoes’ Binge Central.

Thumbnail images: Andrew Toth/Getty Images; Jan Thijs/Amazon Prime Video; United Artists/courtesy Everett Collection; Netflix; Drew Herrmann/FOX; World Athletics/YouTube

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