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Here’s The Batman Trailer With The Cats Trailer Audio And You’re Welcome

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The DC Extended Universe has had a unique life in theaters, and it’s been on a roll over the past few years. The recent virtual DC Fandome event teased what’s coming in the future, including a handful of highly anticipated blockbuster. The first footage for Matt Reeves’ The Batman was debuted at this event, and showed the filmmaker’s unique vision for Gotham City. Now someone had added the audio to the Cats trailer, and the results are delightfully bizarre. You’re welcome, folks.

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I Can See Your Voice Premiere: Grade It!

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From a young age, most of us are taught to try to look past people’s appearances in order to discern their true natures. I Can See Your Voice, Fox’s newest game show, says, “Eh, don’t bother.”

The hour-long series premiered Wednesday following The Masked Singer. Hosted by Masked judge Ken Jeong, I Can See Your Voice tasks contestants with trying to figure out whether or not people are good singers, based on what they look like (and a few other clues). The contestants are aided by a panel of recognizable faces; in the premiere, that panel was populated by Fashion Police‘s Kelly Osbourne, Curb Your Enthusiasm‘s Cheryl Hines, The Real‘s Adrienne Houghton, Arsenio Hall and pop singer Nick Lachey.

The six singers are identified by generic names, such as “football player,” “counselor” or “rock climber.” Some of them are actually professional musicians. “However, some of them are fakers with voices so bad that your ears will hate you forever, and that is a medical fact,” Dr. Ken Jeong informed the audience at the top of the premiere. (And yes, “Dr. Ken Jeong” is how he was announced.)

The goal is for the contestant to pick out all of the bad singers in the rounds that lead up to the final. For every successful guess, the contestant gets $10,000. Then, ahead of the last round, the contestant can risk everything they’ve won for a chance at $100,000.

The premiere’s contestant was Shannon from Chandler, Ariz. Her rounds included lip sync challenges (in which the singers mouth the words to songs they may or may not have previously recorded), getting a glimpse at the photos and videos on a singer’s phone (aka watching a carefully produced video package), watching footage of a singer in the studio (where the voices are incredibly distorted) and hurling rapid-fire questions at a singer to glean whether or not they’re the real deal.

A singer referred to as “stylist” was the last one standing when Shannon got to her final round, and she decided to risk the $30,000 she’d won for a chance at $100k. As it turns out, “stylist” could sing. So Shannon took home the grand prize, and “stylist” sang a duet with Lachey to close out the episode.

Now it’s your turn. What did you think of I Can See Your Voice‘s premiere? Grade the episode via the poll below, then hit the comments with your thoughts!

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The truth about Eudoria Holmes’ secret plan in Enola Holmes

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While Enola is looking for her missing mother, a historical event is playing out in the background: the landmark vote on the 1884 Parliamentary Reform Act. This act would (and did) give more men the right to vote, as voting rights for men were still restricted at this time in the United Kingdom. It was one in a series of events that eventually led to the Representation of the People Act of 1928, which gave full voting rights to English women.

While the reform act is crucial to another plotline in the film, it also sheds light on Eudoria’s motives for her strange behavior. Why, exactly, she left so suddenly is still a bit mystifying, but she was clearly attempting to protect Enola from her dangerous life as a suffragette. Historically, suffragettes did bomb buildings as acts of protest for their right to vote. Eudoria may have been disappointed that the 1884 Reform Act wasn’t going to address women’s voting and thus planned a potentially violent act of protest.

Eudoria says to her daughter at the end of the film, “I left for you, because I couldn’t bear to have this world be your future. So I had to fight. You have to make some noise, if you want to be heard.”  

What Eudoria doesn’t realize is that Enola Holmes has the grit to actually impose change on the world — she doesn’t need it changed for her.

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‘Remember the Audience is Vast and Diverse’

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Journalist and podcaster Sonari Glinton asked panelists Wednesday at TheWrap’s “Building Inclusion from Within roundtable: Using Your platform for Change” to give two pieces of advice – one for executives and for the people of color that are trying to find their way into the industry.

“I would say to executives actually look at the numbers, 44% of the globe speaks English and they look like this panel. Remember the audience is vast and and diverse.”

“I would say to the people that entering in no one is holding your opportunity, you’re holding it,” says actor and producer William Catlett. “Be relentless in creating and the door will open for you.”

On what advice Catlett would give executives, “Hang out with more brothers, hang out with more sisters. You will find out that you have more in common than you do not have in common.”

“Good people don’t always look like you,” added Catlett.

Social entrepreneur and conscious content creator Jlove Calderon to executives “What side of history do you want to be on?” and to people who are trying to come up “what you believe you create, so stay in your highest consciousness and if you are a creator, create.”

Comedian and podcaster Maz Jabroni’s advice to executives “Don’t be lazy if you’re looking for talent or you’re on YouTube, find someone who doesn’t look like you. Check out their material, check out their podcast. You’re going to find a lot of talent out there that you didn’t know existed.”

In terms of what advice he offers up and comers “There is no reason not to create. You hit record on your camera and you’re a star.”

Actor, producer, and television personality Kalen Allen’s advice to executives, “Look at the material, look at the numbers, look at the receipts, and hire people of color in decision making positions and make sure they’re given a voice in the room and at the table.”

Allen’s advice to content creators “Build a brand, and build a platform that can sustain itself without the approval of somebody else. Create something that can stand on its own because if you do that then it will be able to last forever, if you create something that is dependent on somebody giving you a yes or a no, baby that ain’t the way to go.”

Film producer Effie T. Brown’s advice for person that is coming into the business “You need to know your what and your why.”

“What you want to do, and why you want to do it, and sometimes that may change as you get older, but you need to be very clear about that,” added Brown.

On advice for executives, “With love in my heart, I want you to take a deep breath and I want you to realize that change is upon us. Whether we like it or not,  it it is happening. We can not stop it, it is inevitable and the world is no longer domestic and small. The world is global. The world is bigger than just black and white.”

For over a decade, TheWrap’s The Grill event series has led conversations on the convergence between entertainment, media and technology, bringing together newsmakers to debate the challenges and opportunities facing content in the digital age.

TheWrap has created a digital-first experience for TheGrill 2020. This year’s event will focus on the future of theatrical, streaming revolution, building inclusion from within and the growth in podcasting and gaming.  Attendees will have access to keynotes, panel conversations, roundtable discussions and virtual networking.

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