Connect with us

Entertainment

Invincible season 1: Release Date And Provisional Updates!!!

Published

on

– Advertisement –

Invincible season 1; introduction; 

This series is one of the upcoming American Web TV series and was created by Robert Kirkman. Fans are eagerly waiting to watch this series as it was based on the genre of horror. The music of this series was pleased to hear, and the music was composed by john paesano. The amazon prime video presents this thriller series, and I am sure it will be won heavier budgets among the film industry. There were nearly four executive producers: Simon Cacioppo, Robert Kirkman, David Alpert, and finally, Catherine winder. I am sure these production teams will remain for next season. Let us wait for a good ending.

Invincible season 1; interesting facts; 

There were so many marvellous episodes in this series, and each episode run at a time of about 60 minutes. The very first season consists of 8 episodes. Yet, we have to wait for forthcoming new episodes for this series. Stay tuned to discover more information about this series.

Invincible season 1; cast and characters;

There were so may voice characters in this series, and I am sure they will come back in the next season. some of the leading voice characters include steven yuen as mark Grayson, J. K. Simmons as Nolan Grayson, Sandra oh as Debbie Grayson, mark Hamill as art Rosenbaum, Seth Rogen as Allen the alien, Gillian Jacobs as Samantha eve Wilkins, Andrew Rannells as William clock well, Zazie Beetz as amber Bennett, Walton Goggins as Cecil Stedman, Mae Whitman as flight master, etc.…

The above voice characters will come in this series. Let us wait and discover some more voice characters for this series.

Invincible season 1; interesting plot lines; 

There were no official plot details for this series, and the plotlines will be revealed as soon as possible in future days.

The entire series is based on one of the normal teenagers. His father is a full power superhero on the planet. The entire story continues interestingly. Let us wait and discover some more new storylines for this series.

Entertainment

Michael B. Jordan Series ‘Gen:Lock’ Announces Season 2 Writers Room Supporting #ChangeHollywood Inclusion Initiative (EXCLUSIVE)

Published

on

By

The Michael B. Jordan-starring animated series “Gen:Lock” has increased representation and inclusion in its writers room for the show’s upcoming second season, producers Rooster Teeth and Outlier Society have announced.

Daniel Dominguez, Maasai Singleton, Evan Narcisse, Kristle Peluso and Gavin Hignight make up the writers room for the second season of the series, which will premiere on HBO Max. The animated series takes place 50 years in the future amid an oppressive authoritarian regime that threatens to conquer the world; Jordan voices the series’ lead character Julian Chase and also serves as an executive producer.

“When I was a teenager I fell in love with anime because my imagination was always strange and hyperbolic, the way cartoons are,” said Dominguez, who serves as head writer on the new season, said in a statement. “I could not be more honored, and excited to have been given this opportunity to work with Rooster Teeth because they embrace that same spirit of expanding the boundaries of storytelling that is doing its small part to make the world a better and more empathetic place.”

The writers collectively increase the show’s behind the scenes representation across Black, Latinx, and LGBTQIA+ communities.

“Inclusivity and amplifying Black and Brown stories has always been at the forefront of Outlier Society and our productions,” Jordan said. “I am proud to work alongside HBO Max and Rooster Teeth to #ChangeHollywood and ensure our writers room for ‘Gen:Lock’ is a reflection of the world we live in.”

#ChangeHollywood is the latest initiative launched by Jordan’s Outlier Society to help promote inclusivity in the industry. Jordan founded the production company in 2016, which has gone on to become one of the first to publicly adopt an inclusion rider. Alongside Jordan, “Gen:Lock” is executive produced by Alana Mayo of Outlier Society, along with Rooster Teeth’s Matt Hullum and Ryan P. Hall. The series is produced by Rooster Teeth.

The “Gen: Lock” writing team will be featured on a “Meet the Writers of Gen:Lock Season 2” panel at Rooster Teeth’s RTX at Home virtual event, with its Animation Festival programming sponsored by HBO Max. The panel will stream live Sept. 21 at 2 p.m. ET.

Dakota Fanning, Maisie Williams, Golshifteh Farahani, and David Tennant are all set to return for the series’ second season, which is currently in production.

Read a synopsis of “Gen:Lock” Season 2 below:

On a dying Earth in the midst of a now unstoppable climate collapse, two utterly distinct visions for the future of the human race have come to dominate: The Polity and the Union. The future of humanity, if it is to have one, rests in some form of mechanization or digitization. On opposing sides of this fundamental debate, the Polity and the Union remained locked in a brutal and unforgiving war…

A war the Polity is losing, despite the heroic efforts of their greatest soldiers, the Gen:Lock team – Chase, Cammie, Yaz, Kazu and Val, who continue to upload their minds to their Holon units and fight for their vision of a better future on the front lines.

As we meet the figurehead of the Union — Brother Tate — and the citizens for whom he spills Polity blood, the nature of the conflict between the two sides will be seen in a whole new light. A light that, for Chase, will test his loyalty to the Polity… as he digs deeper into the nature of the war and realizes nothing he thought is what it seems…

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Glass First Reviews: Jackson and McAvoy Shine in What Critics Are Calling a Disappointing Trilogy Conclusion

Published

on

By

M. Night Shyamalan seems to have delivered the first disappointment of 2019 with Glass, the much-anticipated sequel to both 2000’s Unbreakable and 2017’s Split. The first two installments, which stand mostly alone from one another, were received rather positively (69% and 76% Tomatometer scores, respectively, with the latter Certified Fresh). Unfortunately, Glass, which stars Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, and Sarah Paulson, looks to be another one of Shyamalan’s duds (initial score: 40%) based on the buzz from initial reviews.

Here’s what the critics are saying about Glass:


Does it meet expectations?

Glass is a major disappointment.
– Germain Lussier, io9

Shyamalan always swings for the fences… This time, though, it’s a swing and a miss.
– Alissa Wilkinson, Vox

Glass shatters under the weight of Shyamalan’s ambition. It’s a messy, muddled, often downright stupid movie. It broke my heart.
– Chris Evangelista, Slashfilm

The movie, watchable as it is, is still a disappointment… more dutiful than necessary.
– Owen Gleiberman, Variety

One of the biggest personal disappointments I’ve ever experienced in a theater.
– Mike Ryan, Uproxx


Is it not satisfying to see the gang all together?

Instead of having his two earlier movies dovetail to create something deeper and richer, it quickly begins to feel like subtraction by addition.
– Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly

In Unbreakable, David and Elijah went together like a lock and key. Here, everyone feels like spare parts.
– David Ehrlich, IndieWire

Its first hurdle is telling a story that connects everything in a satisfying, logical way. To that end, the film succeeds…the film’s first act is absolutely excellent.
– Germain Lussier, io9


(Photo by Universal Pictures)

Will die-hard comic book fans appreciate it?

Glass certainly feels like it’s made by someone who both hates superhero movies and also has never seen one.
– Mike Ryan, Uproxx

Price’s adulations of comic tropes… [feel] as if they were scripted by someone who’s only read a few comic books and is pretty sure they know what they’re about.
– Alissa Wilkinson, Vox

Although he’s made three movies about them, Shyamalan doesn’t actually seem to know much about comic books, and he’s certainly got nothing to say about their journey to cultural dominance.
– Sam Adams, Slate

I’m sure M. Night Shyamalan has read some comic books in his day. I do sometimes wonder how many, though.
– Matt Singer, ScreenCrush


Is it full of Shyamalan’s trademark twists?

This one will not start, or go, or end like you think.
– Vinnie Mancuso, Collider

[There are] a bunch of big reveals to unmask Scooby Doo style and a greater universe to ta-da! unfurl like one of his many, not-always-successful magic tricks.
– Rodrigo Perez, The Playlist


And the ending?

I can also confidently predict that the ending is going to piss more than a few people off.
– Vinnie Mancuso, Collider

[Glass] throws its own three-film buildup under the bus for the sake of a twist and an open-ended non-resolution that can be seen coming down the pike from miles away.
– Karen Han, Polygon

Glass is a good ending to the Unbreakable trilogy, but it may not give you the conclusion you were hoping for. You’ll probably either love or hate the ending.
– Kirsten Acuna, Insider

That ending— which can’t really be explained, for lack of time, space, and to avoid spoilers— is really something, but suffice it to say, it’s a bit baffling.
– Rodrigo Perez, The Playlist


Universal Pictures

(Photo by Universal Pictures)

What about the positives?

It’s not a bad film.
– Don Kaye, Den of Geek

Glass is still a spectacle, but in a singularly un-Marvel manner… Think The Flash getting caught in a traffic jam or The Hulk filing a W-2.
– Vinnie Mancuso, Collider

Glass feels like a giant middle finger to the very people who would be excited to see Glass. That, on its own, is inherently fascinating.
– Mike Ryan, Uproxx

Each time Glass seems like a lost cause, Shyamalan pulls something truly affecting out of his hat.
– Karen Han, Polygon

There is enough experimentation — such as the stirring POV shots during the fight scenes — that shows a director still pushing his craft to bring his viewers something new. He’s not done surprising us.
– Monica Castillo, The Wrap

Glass looks great… Shyamalan and cinematographer Mike Gioulakis compose each frame — sharp and crisp — with a careful offness.
– Richard Lawson, Vanity Fair


How is Bruce Willis’ return as David Dunn?

Willis is phoning in his performance.
– Chris Evangelista, Slashfilm

Jackson and Willis fit back into their older characters like well-worn gloves, both of them knowing what to do and how to move, although Willis gets less to do than the others.
– Don Kaye, Den of Geek


Universal Pictures

(Photo by Universal Pictures)

And Samuel L. Jackson as Mr. Glass?

Jackson is clearly having a blast playing such a devious character. But it’s almost too little, too late.
– Chris Evangelista, Slashfilm

[Jackson is] devilishly fun as Mr. Glass but is ultimately only given a few moments to truly shine. In a movie called Glass, you wish there was more of him.
– Germain Lussier, io9

Although the movie is named after his character, Jackson really doesn’t shine until its final third. He’s delightful in a maniacally sinister way.
– Monica Castillo, The Wrap

For a good third of the film, Jackson outacts anyone sharing his scenes without even saying a word.
– Kirsten Acuna, Insider


Is James McAvoy still amazing as “The Horde”?

He’s more fun to watch now that he doesn’t have to be the whole show.
– Owen Gleiberman, Variety

McAvoy is once again top notch. He lights up the screen with his eerie physicality every time he appears, and cascades crazily through the Horde’s personalities like a human radio with a dial that can’t stop spinning.
– Don Kaye, Den of Geek

McAvoy’s acting abilities… are pretty extraordinary, considering we meet even more of Kevin’s many personalities this time around.
– Germain Lussier, io9


Universal Pictures

(Photo by Universal Pictures)

How are the action scenes?

Every clash between David Dunn and The Beast is bone-crunchingly satisfying.
– Vinnie Mancuso, Collider

The action sequences in Glass are the best of the filmmaker’s career.
– Chris Evangelista, Slashfilm

[There is] a fight scene that’s filmed with all the excitement of a knitting circle.
– David Ehrlich, IndieWire


At least we can always enjoy the first two movies, right?

[Glass] manages to diminish both Unbreakable and Split in retrospect.
– Alissa Wilkinson, Vox

Shyamalan now takes a huge, unfortunate step backwards, tarnishing the legacy of Unbreakable, his best movie, in the process.
– Chris Evangelista, Slashfilm


Glass opens everywhere on January 18.

#1

Adjusted Score: 53.225%

Critics Consensus: Glass displays a few glimmers of M. Night Shyamalan at his twisty world-building best, but ultimately disappoints as the conclusion to the writer-director’s long-gestating trilogy.

Synopsis: From Unbreakable, Bruce Willis returns as David Dunn as does Samuel L. Jackson as Elijah Price, known also by his… [More]

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Janelle Monáe Is Electrifying in the Cathartic Fantasy-Horror Antebellum

Published

on

By

Even if we didn’t live in a country where a shockingly large fraction of people think Confederate monuments are A-O.K., Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz’s Antebellum would resonate like the boom of a Union Army cannon. If you’ve seen the trailer, you already know the twist: Janelle Monáe plays a slave named Eden on a plantation somewhere, ostensibly, in the Civil War–era South. Escape from the property—overseen by a cruel Confederate general (Eric Lange)—is impossible. Worse yet, there’s no escape from this life, which isn’t Eden’s real life at all. She’s really Veronica Henley, a successful sociologist and writer with a loving husband and daughter. For reasons Veronica can’t comprehend, she’s been dropped into a nightmare that looks an awful lot like real-life American history.

Even if Antebellum’s trailer gives the game away, it still holds the movie’s most effective secrets close. The opening is magisterial and chilling, a sweeping shot that captures both the grand beauty of the Southern landscape and the savage horror of these characters’ altered lives. Bush and Renz keep careful control over the tone: this is a tense, thoughtful picture that seeks both to entertain and provoke, rather than to simply punish its audience. It’s also very clearly a work of cathartic fantasy-horror with an underpinning in history, not a historical document, and it leans hard into its pulp sensibilities. That said, some of Antebellum’s more brutal scenes—especially those in the early section of the film—are difficult to watch. But most of its violence is blunt, righteous and gratifying. The whole point, really, is to see the bad guys get it, and Antebellum serves up a satisfying portion of “burn it all down” vengeance.

In the midst of it all, Bush and Renz know the value of a well-placed joke: when a white restaurant hostess shows Veronica and her party to the worst table in the house, her best friend, played by Gabourey Sidibe, sets the woman straight and then fumes behind her back, “The caucasity!” It’s Monáe, though, always as electrifying an actor as she is a singer, who sets the film ablaze. Veronica’s boldness doesn’t vanish when she’s forced into the role of Eden; it lies in wait, coiled like a cobra. “They’re stuck in the past. We are the future,” Veronica says to a group of Black women gathered to hear her speak, but the line belongs to all of history’s Edens, too. Monáe speaks for them as well, in a story where ghosts triumph not just over the past, but also over an insidiously threatening present.

Contact us at letters@time.com.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 NewsLagoon | All Content Rights Reserved.