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Is Jimmy Kimmel Live new tonight, September 11?

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What should Jimmy Kimmel Live! fans expect to see tonight on ABC?

Typically, Jimmy Kimmel Live! takes Friday nights off. But this week hasn’t been your typical week in late-night television.

The Labor Day holiday on Monday gave everyone an extended weekend. Some shows, like The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, have taken the entire week off since then. Others, like The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, have been delivering new shows all week.

The same goes for Jimmy Kimmel Live! and that trend continues tonight. There will be a brand new episode tonight on ABC.

Continuing with the summer of guest hosts, legendary actor Samuel L. Jackson takes over tonight. He’ll try to follow the standard set earlier this week by Josh Gad, Brad Paisley, and John Legend.

To do that, Jackson will interview Tenant star John David Washington. The Christopher Nolan-directed film has received positive reviews and Washington will continue the challenging task of explaining the movie to audiences.

After that, it will be a performance by Swedish singer Snoh Aalegra. Her single “Dying 4 Your Love” released earlier this year.

How to watch Jimmy Kimmel Live! live on ABC

Tonight will be a big night for movie buffs to check out the show. Here are all the details you need to know on how to watch Jimmy Kimmel Live! tonight:

Date: Friday, Sept. 11
Start Time: 11:35 p.m.
TV Channel: ABC
Live Stream: Watch live on Fubo TV. Sign up now for a free seven-day trial. You can also watch on the ABC website or app.

Are you excited for tonight’s show? Share your thoughts in the comment section below and be sure to check back for all the highlights.

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‘The Trial of the Chicago 7’: See First Trailer for Netflix Film

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The Trial of the Chicago 7 has followed up its teaser trailer with a three-minute preview for Aaron Sorkin’s all-star retelling of the event, arriving on Netflix in October.

“What was intended to be a peaceful protest at the 1968 Democratic National Convention turned into a violent clash with police and the National Guard,” the streaming service said of the film. “The organizers of the protest — including Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Tom Hayden and Bobby Seale — were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot and the trial that followed was one of the most notorious in history.”

The film, written and directed by Sorkin, stars Eddie Redmayne as Hayden, Sacha Baron Cohen as Hoffman, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II as Black Panthers co-founder Seale and Succession’s Jeremy Strong as Jerry Rubin, while Frank Langella portrays Judge Julius Hoffman, who was dead-set on a conviction for the Chicago 7.

Michael Keaton, Mark Rylance, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and William Hurt also appear in The Trial of the Chicago 7, out October 16th on the streaming service.

Arlo Guthrie — who appeared at the trial on the side of the defense — recently reflected on the incident to Rolling Stone: “It seemed as if there was [an anti-war] groundswell that came from the bottom up. And that didn’t suit the business people or the politicians. They were looking to find out who was responsible for this. Who’s responsible for all these protesters? So they invented leaders so that they could target the demonstrators.”

“I decided to show up and help make the point that I was sympathetic to [the defendants], even though I disagreed with how they were going about it,” he added. “The trial was trying to show that these guys were the bad guys, and that didn’t make any sense to me.”

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New COVID-19 Rules Won’t Impact U.K. Production, Exhibition But Optics Aren’t Ideal

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A worrying surge in COVID-19 cases in the U.K. has threatened to unravel much of the progress made across the film and TV industry in recent months, but Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s latest round of restrictions won’t impact the production and exhibitor sectors in any major way just yet.

With coronavirus cases projected to reach 49,000 a day by mid-October unless action is taken, the government on Tuesday enforced a 10pm curfew for bars, restaurants and pubs in England and a renewed work from home directive for office workers — measures that will be in place for six months. Meanwhile, COVID-safe protocols are now legally binding in the workplace, with negligence punishable by fines up to £10,000 ($12,700) or closure. Under the new rules, cinema screenings and theater performances can run past the 10pm deadline, although films and shows can’t be scheduled, nor alcohol served, after that time.

For many in the industry who’ve been on tenterhooks in anticipation of stricter measures, there’s palpable relief that the rules aren’t shutting business down — in fact, far from it, for now — but concerns remain among some exhibitors that the confused messaging will impact the public’s willingness to get back to cinemas, while unions worry that a soon-terminated furlough scheme will be catastrophic for workers.

Tim Richards, CEO of European cinema giant Vue, tells Variety that the new rules will have minimal repercussions for multiplexes, which will only lose a few late shows during the week. “The bigger concern is the impact it has on our customers in general, in terms of leaving their homes,” warned the executive.

“There has to be some level of impact when they’re constantly being told, ‘There’s a problem, there’s a problem,’” said Richards, whose chain is generating around 30-50% of its three-year run rate with few new films in the pipeline for fall. “We’re basically operating at a small loss but breaking even. That’s with studio support in releasing library films, which have been well-received. But we need to get back into business [with new films].”

There’s concern, however, that studios could see the worsening COVID-19 figures in the U.K. and other European countries such as Spain, consider the dismal situation for movie theaters in U.S. cities such as New York, and delay major fall releases like “Black Widow,” set to debut Oct. 28 in the U.K., and James Bond film “No Time to Die,” slated for Nov. 12.

On the production side, the U.K.’s latest rules mercifully have no major impact on filming, which can continue as long as workplaces adhere to COVID-secure guidelines, which are now legally enforceable. “It’s business as usual for film and high-end TV production in all four U.K. nations who are operating within appropriate industry guidelines in COVID-secure settings,” said Adrian Wootton, CEO of the British Film Commission and Film London.

Wootton, who helped compile the production guidelines in the spring as part of the BFI Screen Sector Taskforce, said the measures were “designed to be rigorous, with thorough, comprehensive recommendations around social distancing and personal hygiene.”

“We know U.K. productions have been following [the guidelines] when restarting production. Studios and streamers also have their own extremely rigorous protocols, which sit alongside BFC guidance, as well as production-specific risk assessments,” said Wootton.

U.K. productions haven’t been free of COVID-19 shutdowns, but have managed to resume smoothly under the guidelines. “The Batman” grabbed international headlines when filming was halted Sept. 3 after star Robert Pattinson was stricken with COVID-19, but production restarted after just two weeks. Similarly, ITV’s “Coronation Street” also briefly paused after a positive COVID-19 test, and Sky’s “Brassic” is the latest to halt filming. But for shows and films of a certain scale that can withstand the financial hit, getting cameras rolling again is, crucially, achievable.

John McVay, head of producers’ trade body Pact, notes that there’s nothing in the new regulations that will have “a detrimental impact on production.” For McVay, a key engineer of the U.K.’s £500 million ($648.5 million) film and TV production restart program, the timing is essential, particularly as the fund will help a wider range of productions get back on track.

The program, which is designed to help U.K. productions secure insurance, will soon be opening applications. Earlier this week, Pact hosted a call with 400 production companies going over the fund criteria. “My plea to everyone is to get back into production,” said McVay, who notes the fines attached to enforcing COVID-secure guidelines is an “escalation” that won’t be taken lightly across all facets of production.

McVay allows, however, that Johnson’s promise of more “firepower” if these measures aren’t enough, and the country plunges into another national lockdown, will be “complete disaster for the whole economy.”

For the beleaguered theater and live events sector, although the new rules exempt shows from finishing at 10pm on the dot — a challenging scenario for most live performances — the prospect of six more months of socially distanced performances means theaters may not be able to reopen fully until well into 2021.

Philippa Childs, head of entertainment union Bectu, said the six-month period “could be the final nail in the coffin for many institutions unless the government takes further properly targeted action.”

Childs highlights that without an extension to the government’s Job Retention Scheme, which is set to end on Oct. 31, “so many workers face imminent redundancy, and even those not at immediate risk will be wondering whether it is worth staying the course.”

“The government has to provide further sector specific support such as subsidized tickets, extending the furlough scheme and government-backed insurance for live events and theatre performances,” advised Childs. “If the government does not take immediate steps in this area we may not have a functioning theater and events sector to return to when this is finally over.”

Naman Ramachandran contributed to this report.

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A Whiskey Writer Names The Independent American Whiskeys He Loves Best

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Christopher Osburn has spent the past fifteen years in search of “the best” — or at least his very favorite — sips of whisk(e)y on earth. In the process, he’s enjoyed more whisk(e)y drams than his doctor would dare feel comfortable with, traveled to over 20 countries testing local spirits, and visited more than fifty distilleries worldwide.


Sure, you can spend the rest of your life drinking whiskeys made by large brands and end up completely happy with your choices. We’re talking about the likes of Jim Beam, Jack Daniels, Jameson, and Suntory (along with some of the slightly smaller brands). These behemoths all make enough whiskeys to keep your palate interested and engaged for decades to come.

But if you have more of an adventurous spirit or root for the underdog and you want to sip on something tuly unique, there are countless brands out there that don’t have parent companies or hedge fund investors. True independents — focused on perfecting their specific version of the grain-to-glass experience.

Below you’ll find the independent American whiskey expressions that I love best.

Leopold Bro’s Maryland-Style Rye

ABV: 43%

Price: $48.99

The Story:

This is a seasonal release from Leopold Brothers and won’t be offered again until 2022. This pre-prohibition-style rye from the Colorado-based distillery is aged for two years in new charred American oak casks. Unlike its Pennsylvania-style counterpart with its rich oak and big notes of peppery spice, Maryland-style rye is much more mellow and fruit-driven.

This offering lives up its name with smooth, easy drinkability.

Tasting Notes:

There’s a lot going on with this whiskey as you nose it. The first aromas that fill your nostrils are dried orange peel, cinnamon, and sweet cream. The first sip brings forth flavors of butterscotch, caramelized sugar, sweet vanilla, and just a hint of peppery spice. The finish is long, warming, and filled with toffee, cocoa, and a final flourish of white pepper.

Bottom Line:

If you can get your hands on a bottle of this seasonal release, make it last. Sip it slowly with a few ice cubes on a chilly fall evening.

Dry Fly Straight Washington Wheat Whiskey

ABV: 45%

Price: $45.99

The Story:

In recent years, wheat whiskey has become fairly popular. One of the best is Dry Fly Washington Wheat. Made from 100% soft white wheat, it’s distilled two times before aging for 3 plus years in charred new American oak barrels.

The result is a very well–rounded, easy-drinking whiskey.

Tasting Notes:

This whiskey deserves a nosing before sampling. Unlike a high-rye whiskey, the wheat gives the aromas of sweet cereal, charred oak, and caramel. The first sip yields sweet cream, sticky toffee, cooking spices, and honey. The finish is long, warming, and dry — with hints of toasted oak and just a whisper of pepper at the very end.

Bottom Line:

The reason I picked this whiskey is that it feels effortlessly velvety and smooth. There’s no reason to mix this highly drinkable whiskey into a cocktail.

Kings County Peated Bourbon

ABV: 45%

Price: $44.99

The Story:

If you’re a fan of Scotch, you’re probably at least aware of the peat-smoked whiskies, specifically those from distilleries located on the island of Islay. But you might not know that it isn’t just Scotch that’s peat-smoked. One of the best American offerings comes from Kings County. This Peated Bourbon is made using peat-smoked malted barley. The result is a highly complex whiskey with sweetness from corn and smoke from peat.

Tasting Notes:

Your first whiff of this whiskey will transport you to Scotland — making you think of the likes of Ardbeg and Bruichladdich. But behind the smoke, there’s also sweet caramel and rich vanilla. The first sip is a mixture of soothing smoke, butterscotch, and dried fruits. The finish is long, warming, and filled with more campfire smoke paired with sweet cream.

Bottom Line:

If you get your hands on a bottle of this special small-batch bourbon, you should enjoy it with a blanket on your lap in front of a bonfire on a cold fall night.

Stranahan’s Diamond Peak Colorado Whiskey

ABV: 47%

Price: $79.99

The Story:

Part of the appeal of Stranahan’s Diamond Peak is the fact that from batch to batch, the flavors will be subtly different. Made from 100% Colorado barley and water and aged in charred, new American oak casks for four years, Diamond Peak also comes with its own shot glass. (The bottle ingeniously comes with a black metal 3-ounce cap — a clever little topper for a fantastic bottle.)

Tasting Notes:

Your first sniff will deliver a ton of flavor notes. First comes hints of cinnamon and candied pecans before leading into sweet cream and butterscotch. The first sip drops notes of toasted oak, rich caramel, spicy chocolate, and brown sugar. The finish is long, warming, and full of velvety sweetness and fall spices.

Bottom Line:

Take a hike and bring a bottle with you. As soon you reach a lookout, take a seat, crack open the bottle and take a sip while you sit back and enjoy the view.

Dad’s Hat Pennsylvania Straight Rye

ABV: 47.5%

Price: $40.99

The Story:

It might seem like rye has only become popular in the last few years, but before prohibition, it was arguably the most popular whiskey. Of the pre-prohibition ryes, there were two very popular styles: Pennsylvania and Maryland. This one is a Pennsylvania rye. That means this rye, made from local grain and aged for at least four years, is spicier than its counterpart.

Tasting Notes:

Like all rye whiskeys, this one deserves a nice nosing before taking a sip. If you do, you’ll be met with subtle spice, brown sugar, and creamy vanilla. The first sip will bring you white pepper, Christmas spices, rich caramel, dried cherries, and delicate floral notes. The finish is long, rich, and full of a pleasing kick of black pepper and butterscotch.

Bottom Line:

Unlike dad’s actual hat, you shouldn’t leave this whiskey laying around just anywhere. It’s a lovely fall dram and a fun one to share and taste with rye whiskey newbies.

Iron Smoke Straight Bourbon

ABV: 40%

Price: $45.99

The Story:

It’s likely that you’ve never heard of Iron Smoke. This small-batch bourbon is made using locally sourced grains in limited batches. At first glance, it looks like well-made whiskey using a similar recipe to many other well-made whiskeys. The difference is Iron Smoke’s version is a four-grain bourbon with applewood smoked wheat. The result is a subtly smoky, sweet bourbon you’ll want to sip all autumn long.

Tasting Notes:

The first aromas you’ll be met with when nosing this bourbon are sweet corn, rich caramel, and velvety vanilla. The first sip teases flavors of toasted marshmallow, subtle bonfire smoke, sweet cream, and brown sugar. The finish is long, dry, warming, and filled with a pleasing kiss of applewood smoke that will make you wish you had a plate of ribs to pair the dram with.

Bottom Line:

This truly unique expression might be the perfect bridge for peaty Scotch fans to get into the world of American bourbon. Enjoy it on the rocks and sip it slowly.

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