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Ja Morant And Zion Williamson Headline The NBA All-Rookie Teams

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The 2019 NBA Draft sent a good deal of talent into the NBA, most notably a pair of budding stars from the top two picks in Rookie of the Year Ja Morant in Memphis and Zion Williamson in New Orleans.

While those two made the most headlines, they certainly weren’t alone in having an impact in their first year in the NBA, and on Tuesday, the league announced the 10 rookies that earned All-Rookie team honors. Morant was a unanimous selection to the first team, while Kendrick Nunn from Miami followed closely behind with 98 first team votes, and Morant’s Grizzlies teammate Brandon Clarke at 92 first team votes.

First Team All-Rookie

Ja Morant
Kendrick Nunn
Brandon Clarke
Zion Williamson
Eric Paschall

Second Team All-Rookie

Tyler Herro
Terence Davis II
Coby White
P.J. Washington
Rui Hachimura

Herro fell just one point shy of Paschall for the fifth spot on the first-team All-Rookie, but the Heat swingman will surely settle for a second team spot and being the only member of either All-Rookie squad still battling it out in the playoffs. R.J. Barrett and Matisse Thybulle were the two rookies that fell just shy of a spot on the second team, 13 and 19 points behind Hachimura respectively.

There will certainly be some debate about who should’ve ended up where — P.J. Washington, in particular, had a strong case for a first team spot — but overall the 10 players seem to be the right ones, even if the ordering has room for conversation.

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Director-as-Shaman: João Paulo Miranda Maria on Invoking the Invisible Demons of the Oppressed in ‘Memory House’

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João Paulo Miranda Maria’s debut feature “Memory House”  – a nuanced look at systemic racism in modern Brazil – is about to make its third appearance on this year’s festival circuit.

The only Latin American film to be selected for the Cannes Label this year, “Memory House” has also premiered at Toronto and will run in San Sebastian’s New Director’s Line Up later this week.

Miranda Maria uses richly composed scenes and minimal dialogue to tell the story of Cristovam, an indigenous Black man from the rural north of Brazil who migrates to a conservative Austrian community in the south to work at a dairy.

Steeped in imagery from indigenous Brazilian folklore, the film is a study of what happens to an oppressed minority as decades of abuse chip away at his humanity.

The protagonist undergoes a metamorphosis inspired by the “caboclo boiadeiro” figures of the bull and cowboy, as he realizes that he shares more in common with the dairy’s cattle than his fellow workers.

A timely commentary on integration and colonialism, the screenplay was written and developed during a Cannes Next Step Workshop, which Miranda Maria attended in 2015, at a time when his native Brazil was in a state of flux.

Later that year the Brazil’s president would be impeached, eventually paving the way for Jair Bolsonaro’s government that Miranda Maria said has allowed “very conservative people to have a podium to speak”.

Miranda Maria added that he has always felt racial tensions bubbling under the surface in Brazil “which is at odds with its image as a tropical carnival paradise.”

And, like the spirits invoked by the character his film, the director added that in transferring these tensions to the cinema, there is a shamanistic element to his work.

“One producer told me my films are like voodoo or black magic, an energy that I’m summoning.

“I don’t want audiences to necessarily understand everything, but I want them to feel it. I want to show them what they are not seeing. It’s invisible, but you can feel it.”

In “Memory House,” the director attempts to evoke these feelings through detailed scene compositions, and he credits his partnership with Oscar-winning cinematographer, Benjamin Echazarreta (“A Fantastic Woman”, “Gloria”) with helping him to realise this.

“He saw from the beginning that I always bring a lot of notes with me about each shot. I make few shots and very few options for each

scene, with one camera for everything,” he said.

“Each shot is practically a picture, minimalist, but full of detail creating an image that suggests more than what is visible,” he added.

According to the director, his inspirations include the Japanese auteur Yasujirō Ozu, who eschewed tracking shots in favour of layered scene and sound compositions.

However, this method may also have its origins in necessity. Hailing from a small town outside Rio, with no film industry contacts, Miranda Maria spent his early film career persuading wedding videographers – and anyone he could – to lend him equipment, usually a single camera.

His father also lent him his mobile phone – one of the few at the time which came a two megapixel camera – and so his carefully crafted scene compositions began, and his first award – from CNN in 2009 – came out of a call to find the best films in the world shot on video.

Miranda Maria is also an admirer of Stanley Kubrick’s work, and the opening dairy scenes and his method of capturing light inside the characters eyes (inspired by” 2001’s” Leopard scene) bear testament to this.

The very physical and largely silent performance of the film’s protagonist – the octogenarian actor and veteran of Cinema Novo Antonio Pitanga –  is another key aspect of the film.

“We spent the day walking around Rio – which made me realize he was up to the task physically. I told him “I want to give you this challenge. It’s a big risk – it’s grotesque, ridiculous, fragile and strong and I want to see the blood in your eyes. But if agree you to do this it will make my dream’.  And he loved it.”

Pitanga – whose daughter Camlia is a celebrated telenovela actress –featured in Angelo Duarte’s Palme d’Or winning “Keeper of Promises” and also acted in Glauber Rocha’s first feature – but finally, with “Memory House,”he has got to play the lead role.

“He says it was a gift”, Miranda Maria added.

The director, who decamped to Paris last year for the film’s post production – and has now settled there with his family –  is currently working on his second equally prophetic feature: a story about the mistreatment of the Amazon Rain Forest and how it seeks its revenge.

Memory House
Courtesy: THE PR FACTORY

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Kal Penn On His Respect For Young Voters, And Wanting ‘Harold And Kumar’ To Go To Space

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Kal Penn has done his time in both Hollywood (House and the Harold and Kumar trilogy) and Washington, D.C. (as part of the Obama administration), which has led to plenty of jokes about him moving from White Castle to the White House, and he’s about to combine his talents for the greater good. On National Voter Registration Day, Freeform will launch Kal Penn Approves This Message, a six-part topical series that’s geared toward younger voters (the Gen Z and Millennial crowds) and the issues that matter most to them. Each episode will drop on a Tuesday and will be available the following day on Hulu in all of its unscripted, spirited, and non-partisan glory.

Penn plans to explore wide-ranging topics, from voter empowerment to healthcare, judges, education, and the environment. He’ll do so through comedic field-pieces and interviews, and he was cool enough to speak with us about how much he admires the passion of young voters and how they give him hope for the future. I also couldn’t resist challenging him to beat Tom Cruise into space after I learned about his suggestion for a fourth Harold and Kumar installment, and Penn fielded that issue with grace.

Obviously, we’ve got pandemic complications with this year’s election. Do you think that will hinder the vote or motivate people?

Well, one of the things that I’ve noticed is that I can’t really remember a time when we had this much awareness about the process of voting. The pandemic has resulted in a lot of discussion — about mail and early voting that exists in so many places, absentee ballots, and obviously voting the day-of. We can get younger people to be poll workers, since older people traditionally do it, and they may be less likely to do it because of their heightened risk of COVID. So if there was ever a silver lining, of our awareness on the different ways to vote and how, it’s now. That’s my take on our crazy world.

As a general rule during a regular year, though, why do you feel that so few people vote in the U.S.?

Well, that’s something that we’re hoping to tackle with our show. I don’t know, it is certainly something. I forget the stat, we have it in one of our documents, in an earlier episode. The U.S. is 120 out of all the countries? It’s something very surprising. I will say that one of the things that we found very promising is the uptick in the number of young voters. 2018 had some of the biggest youth-vote numbers in decades.

Yeah, they are really not sitting back and simply letting things happen.

And the reason that I think that’s so interesting is because all the data says that if you voted once, you’re more likely to vote again in the future. But it’s also that the voting block, the youth-vote as a block, is not the same humans, year-to-year. So, if you’re looking at the African-American vote, the Italian-American vote, South-Asian vote and all that, you look at that from a four-year period to a four-year period. And with the exception of expanding to new votes within that demographic, those are the same humans when you see when they’re voting or not. The thing with young voters is that they’re not young forever. You age into and out of the demographic very quickly, so you’re comparing totally different sets of people. So, it’s a more open question than otherwise, and one that, hopefully, with all the awareness of the election this time, I hope people turn out.

I’m close to a few college students, who are very concerned with how things are going. And while every generation tends to think that they’ve got the biggest mess to clean up, it’s fair to say that Gen Z can claim that title. Do you have any advice for them on how to stay positive?

Well, I think that it seems like they’re doing a great job without our advice to begin with.

[Laughs] Fair enough.

They’re being so involved and so engaged and being so innovative in so many of the things that they are doing and saying. And they’re forcing everyone to take notice. If there’s anything, I would just say that one of the things I understand their frustration on is the slow speed at which things happen. We now live in a world where you can get a news story 30 seconds after it happens, and there are literally apps that will tell you what happened around the corner, or Twitter, which is somewhat of an echo chamber. That’s not how our democracy works because we have three branches of government that are designed to move very slowly on purpose, and that can be incredibly frustrating. The positive side to that, obviously, is that we’re not a dictatorship, so we have three branches of government that move very slowly. But that’s something I’ve talked about with younger folks who are concerned, not just with the slow pace of things like that but with the lack of awareness around technology, like with the Zuckerberg hearings in Congress. It’s embarrassing how many people just don’t know how the internet works and what company runs what. So, I think that’s something that they can be very helpful with because they’re the ones who are going to be entering public policy and the workforce and running for office themselves, and that gives me a lot of hope.

You’re going to be addressing education in one episode. Do you plan to talk about student debt? That’s on just about every age group’s mind.

We don’t discuss student debt that explicitly, and I’ll tell you why. When we were putting that episode together, we looked at how a lot of shows have already done really fantastic episodes on student debt. And we couldn’t really find anybody who had done an episode on college and trade school in a specific context. And that context was, well, it’s always bothered me that there’s a fabricated beef between college and trade school advocates. It’s like, “Oh, you only get to go to university if you’re an elitist. And this person only went to trade school because they couldn’t go to college.” Could we just stop with all that, please? Who does that argument serve, this fabricated argument?

It’s super strange that people dwell on this.

Like this reminds me of Cardi B versus Nicki Minaj. Is this even a beef? Can’t I like both of them? Why are you saying that I’m not allowed to like both of them. So that got us thinking about “what is the actual issue here?” One is automation, and whether when you go to trade school or college, the risk of jobs and careers being automated is serious. Other countries like China and Brazil are investigating these things and investing in potential solutions. Are we? And if we’re not, shouldn’t we be focusing on that instead of creating this fake beef between each other about who went to college and who went to trade school, and what does that mean? So our episode looks at that and how it impacts the global economy and especially in our own economy when people who are 18 turn 40, and when they have kids, what happens to their jobs? That’s how we look at education, and it’s a pretty good example of our non-partisan take on these types of issues.

Do you still have hopes for a 4th Harold and Kumar movie in your back pocket?

Helllll yes!

Where would you like to see the guys go next?

Oh man, look, all my tattoos are astronomy-related, so I kinda like the idea of going to the space station.

You should try to beat Tom Cruise and Vin Diesel to space. I want to see it happen.

Oh no, Tom Cruise will beat us! It’s a little tricky with scheduling because they guys who created the franchise are created the Cobra Kai show, and John Cho is in New Zealand to do a movie, and I’m about to start Clarice, the Silence Of The Lambs remake, so I am hoping soon. We keep constantly talking about it, but we just have to find the right time.

Freeform’s ‘Kal Penn Approves This Message’ will premiere on Tuesday, September 22, at 10:30pm EST.

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Gémeaux 2020: Découvrez les plus beaux looks du gala!

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Dimanche soir, c’était soir de gala! Quelques étoiles du gratin artistique québécois ont troqué leur linge mou de confinement pour leurs plus beaux habits en vue du 35e Gala des prix Gémeaux. Bien que l’équipe de la célébration n’ait pas déroulé un grand tapis rouge cette année, le public a tout de même pu jeter un œil aux superbes looks de ses comédiens et comédiennes chouchous. Un photographe engagé par la production était d’ailleurs aux premières loges, question de capturer quelques souvenirs des festivités.

L’animatrice de la soirée, Véronique Cloutier, était particulièrement à tomber dans deux looks totalement élégants. D’autres personnalités ayant monté sur les planches du Studio 42 ont également attiré notre attention par leur tenue des plus parfaites pour l’occasion.

Découvrez nos coups de cœur mode des Prix Gémeaux 2020!

 

France Beaudoin

 

Éric Myre

 

Katherine Levac et Marie-Ève Janvier

Éric MyreKatherine Levac et Marie-Ève Janvier

Eric Myre


Marie-Eve Janvier et Jean-Francois Breau lors de l’Avant-première

Marie-Eve Janvier et Jean-Francois Breau

Eric Myre


Fabienne Larouche étincelante à souhait

Eric Myre


Christine Beaulieu

Eric Myre


Guylaine Tremblay et Josée Deschênes (qui jouent ensemble dans la nouvelle série Le Phoenix)

Guylaine Tremblay et Josée Deschênes

@Eric Myre


Maude Guérin, Catherine Proulx-Lemay, Hélène Bourgeois Leclerc, Cassandra Latreille et Marina Orsini

Eric Myre

@Éric Myre

 

Isabel Richer, Eve Landry, Florence Longpré (avez-vous vu son nouvel amoureux en coulisses?) et Elise Guilbeault

Eric Myre

@Éric Myre


Guy Jodoin (qui a, une fois de plus, pris le temps de remercier sa tendre moitié Édith!)

Eric Myre


Patrice Bélanger et Marie-Lyne Joncas (et son énooorme nouveau tatouage!)

Eric Myre

Eric Myre

 

Catherine-Anne Toupin, Sophie Cadieux, Evelyne Brochu (rayonnante, enceinte de jumeaux!) et Virginie Fortin

Eric Myre

Éric Myre


Rosalie Bonenfant

Éric Myre


Geneviève Schmidt

Éric Myre


Véronique Cloutier

Éric Myre

@Eric Myre


Vincent-Guillaume Otis

Eric Myre


Michel Charette

@Éric Myre


Jean-Philippe Dion

@Éric Myre


Fayolle Jean Jr.

Eric Myre


Quel est votre look préféré? Dites-nous ça en commentaire!

 

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