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Jordan Peele, Issa Rae Team Up for Film on Female Identity

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One of Jordan Peele’s upcoming projects is a potential star vehicle for Issa Rae that is rooted in psychological sci-fi and horror.

Acclaimed filmmaker Jordan Peele is teaming up with “Insecure” creator and star Issa Rae for “Sinkhole,” an upcoming film from Universal Pictures that will tackle questions of female perfection and identity.

Deadline reported that Universal beat out more than 10 studio bidders and multiple talent and filmmaker packages for screen rights in what amounted to a low seven-figure deal. The film will reportedly be an adaptation of author Leyna Krow’s short story, which follows a young family that moves into its dream home despite the gaping sinkhole in the backyard. The mysterious sinkhole manages to fix broken and destroyed things. However, the story asks, what if that thing is a person?

Though the project is being developed as a potential star vehicle for Rae, firm casting details and a prospective release date have not been determined. Universal’s Senior Vice President of Production Sara Scott will oversee the project for the studio. Per Deadline, the film is rooted in psychological sci-fi and horror which Peele is no stranger to but also focuses on commentary on the human condition.

Universal will produce the film, while Peele will produce via Monkeypaw Productions. Rae, Win Rosenfeld, Montrel McKay and Sara Rastogi will also serve as producers. The project is part of Monkeypaw Productions’ five-year deal with Universal Pictures, which distributed Peele’s acclaimed “Get Out” and Us” horror films, as well as “The Photograph” and “Little,” both of which starred Rae.

Rae has executive produced and starred in a variety of popular film and television projects over the last few years, including “Insecure,’ which was nominated for three Emmys yesterday. The show was nominated for “Outstanding Comedy Series,” while Rae and Yvonne Orji received nominations for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series, respectively.

As for Peele, the “Get Out” and “Us” director has become one of Hollywood’s most celebrated talents in recent years. Peele, who previously starred in hit sketch series “Key & Peele,” has begun working behind the camera with increasing frequency recently and has executive produced shows such as Amazon Prime Video’s “Hunters” and CBS All Access’ “The Twilight Zone.” He is also executive producing HBO’s upcoming “Lovecraft Country” horror series and highly-anticipated upcoming horror film “Candyman.”

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When Does Selena Gomez’s Rare Beauty Launch?

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We’ve been waiting eagerly for more information on Selena Gomez’s new cosmetics company Rare Beauty and we finally have an official launch date: Rare Beauty will drop on Sept. 3.

Gomez took to her personal Instagram page on Aug. 4 to confirm the news with her followers and tease a photo from what looks like a Rare Beauty photoshoot. “I’m SO excited to finally share that @RareBeauty will be launching September 3rd only at @Sephora, @SephoraCanada, @SephoraMx and RareBeauty.com. I’ve had so much fun creating everything and can’t wait for y’all to try it all! I hope you love it as much as I do!” read her caption.

Since Gomez first announced she was working on her own makeup brand via Instagram back in February, fans (ahem, us) have been following along closely to learn more information about the secret project. She created an Instagram page dedicated to the soon-to-be company (which has gathered over one million followers), gave us a peek in her music video for “Boyfriend,” divulged in an interview that the foundation and concealer will include 48 shades, and shared a series of selfies experimenting with the makeup which has led us to firmly believe that a liquid eyeliner must be involved.

While there’s still no word on the exact products, we won’t have to wait much longer. Mark your calendars, because Rare Beauty’s launch is less than a month away.

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Woman Shares 20 Important Things People Should Know Before Marrying Someone

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How do you know when is the right time to marry your significant other? Do you wait until your third anniversary? Or do you pay off your student loans first? No, wait. Let’s just forget the latter and focus on this lifetime.

According to Twitter user @cxkenobxkerry, however, a much more important question we should be asking ourselves is if we really should marry them in the first place.

On July 23, she posted a thread titled ‘Don’t Get Married Before‘ where the woman listed all the things we should know about ourselves and our partner before we tie the knot with them. From religion to sexuality, @cxkenobxkerry listed questions, touching on a wide range of themes that should reveal whether two people are compatible or not.

As of this article, the thread has over 220K likes and 60K retweets, and some commenters are even suggesting additional questions as well. Continue scrolling, check it out and who knows, maybe it’ll provide you with some answers, too.

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Dr. Joshua Klapow, a clinical psychologist and host of the podcast The Kurre and Klapow Show, defines romantic compatibility as “the degree to which each person’s view of love, intimacy, and attraction (and the expression of these experiences) work together for mutual benefit.”

Susan Trombetti, matchmaker and CEO of Exclusive Matchmaking, expanded on this, saying that romantic compatibility happens when two people are “equally attracted to each other.” But more than feeling butterflies and being emotionally intimate, according to Susan, romantic compatibility happens when they’re both “on the same page about where you want the relationship to go.”

When it comes to romance, it’s all about the details, like doing activities the two of you can enjoy together. This gets to the heart of romantic compatibility the way Jessmina “Minaa B.” Archbold, psychotherapist, social worker, and author of Rivers Are Coming: Essays and Poems on Healing, defines it. For Archbold, romantic compatibility is when two partners respect each other and are interested in learning more about each other. “You don’t necessarily have to share the same interests,” Archbold told Elite Daily. “But it means caring enough to learn about each other in order to strengthen the relationship bond, while also learning about each other’s needs.”

The thread continues to evolve to this day

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All of this doesn’t mean that opposites can’t attract one another. If one person is, for example, really interested in theater and the arts, and their partner is really immersed in sports and fitness, that doesn’t mean that they can’t be in a healthy, happy relationship. Opposites on the outside can attract, but similarities in values and morals on the inside are what’s necessary for a good match.

And here’s what other people have been saying about it

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Tu Dors Nicole is the rare film to capture the tedium of summer

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Illustration for article titled Finally, a coming-of-age film that captures how damn boring summer can be

Screenshot: Tu Dors Nicole

Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by new releases, premieres, current events, or occasionally just our own inscrutable whims. This week: As August kicks off and the warmest season begins drawing to a close, we’re looking back at some of our favorite summer-themed movies.


Tu Dors Nicole (2014)

For many people, especially those fresh out of school and circumscribed by money or geography, summer is an aimless time defined by temp gigs, tenuous relationships, and desperate attempts to relieve boredom. It’s understandable that so many filmmakers tend to liven up their summer films with external conflict or improbably high stakes, if only because it’s very difficult to dramatize the sheer tedium of youth. In Tu Dors Nicole, however, director Stéphane Lafleur depicts one of the most resonant, believable lazy summers of the past decade simply by focusing on idle moments too rarely captured on film. Much of Tu Dors Nicole features bored people trying to entertain themselves by any means necessary. The results are often riveting and beautiful.

Lafleur’s portrait of a dog-days summer is grounded by the friendship between Nicole (Julianne Côté) and Véronique (Catherine St-Laurent), two Québécois twentysomethings suffering from severe post-grad malaise. When Nicole receives her first credit card in the mail, she and Véronique impulsively buy tickets to Iceland in order to “do nothing, but somewhere else.” It’s an excuse to get out of the suburbs, particularly after Nicole’s brother, Rémi (Marc-André Grondin), turns their family home into a makeshift recording studio for his indie/garage rock band. Unfortunately, the plans are quickly scuttled by Véronique, who doesn’t live at home and can’t abruptly quit her job because of rent. A rift grows between the two old friends.

The Ghost World-esque narrative compels on its own merits because Lafleur and his stars are committed to indirectly communicating universal feelings, like jealousy and betrayal and the painful feeling of drifting apart from a close friend. There’s a brief blow-up, but most emotions are unspoken, conveyed instead by pointed glances or pregnant silences. Lafleur never makes it too explicit, but it’s clear that Nicole is the more insecure and socially defensive of the two, the Enid to Véronique’s Rebecca, and her friendship with Véronique has always sat on slightly unsteady ground. When Véronique hits it off with Rémi’s new drummer, JF (Francis La Haye), who also casually flirts with Nicole, lingering resentments are brought slightly closer to the surface.

Yet this plot never threatens to overwhelm Tu Dors Nicole, a film much more interested in conveying the weight of ennui. When she’s not at her job folding clothes in a secondhand store (where she frequently shoplifts), Nicole putters around her neighborhood, watching the neighbors and walking empty suburban streets at night because of her insomnia. A general half-awake feeling pervades Tu Dors Nicole, underscored by the film’s gorgeous black-and-white 35mm photography, which spotlights the gray areas Nicole moves through, and the fact that every character exists in some kind of liminal state. Nicole and Véronique face relatively uncertain futures, likely apart instead of together. Rémi knows his band will soon break up when Pat (Simon Larouche), his bassist, starts a family. In the film’s most overtly surrealist touch, a local neighborhood kid (Godefroy Reding) speaks with a sexy adult voice, which he believes gives him a shot at Nicole, his former babysitter. Though he exists in the film’s margins, he’s the literal manifestation of the shaky bridge between childhood and adulthood that Lafleur probes so well.

Like all great coming-of-age stories, Tu Dors Nicole focuses on a specific element of adolescence, mainly the terrible time when someone finally realizes that they’re in control of their own fate. Lafleur and Côté ignore all the traditional platitudes about “likability” and render Nicole unique but recognizable, someone who can be petulant one moment and generous the next. She is a typical college graduate in many ways, unsure of how to live out the rest of her life, and yet her behavior also suggests she’s completely lost in a deeper sense. (A telling moment: Nicole, sitting in the stands of an empty baseball field with Véronique and JF, is the only one who doesn’t react when suddenly informed that a ball is headed right for them.) As the English translation of the film’s title suggests, Tu Dors Nicole traces Nicole’s slow “awakening,” concluding on a reckless act that nevertheless implies she’s finally taking the reins of her own life, even though she can’t always predict the consequences.

Availability: Tu Dors Nicole is available to stream for free (with ads) on VUDU and on Kanopy (with a library card or university log-in). It can also be rented or purchased from Google Play, iTunes, and YouTube.

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