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Man Lost His Phone, Ended Up Finding It In The Jungle Nearby And Laughed At All The Monkey ‘Selfies’ On It Interview With Owner

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Losing a phone is quite an awful experience. Not only are you now somewhat disconnected from the rest of the world and your routine is compromised, but you’re also having that near-heart attack feeling worrying about who might get their hands on all of your precious photos and videos (and memes, don’t forget your precious memes).

Now, what if your phone somehow gets lost and finds itself in the hands of a monkey? This is exactly what happened to Zackryds Rodzi, a 20-year-old senior year computer science student from Batu Pahat, Johor.

When it comes to stealing phones, you wouldn’t naturally expect a monkey to do it!

Image credits: Zackryds Rodzi

So, Zackryds, with whom Bored Panda got in touch, woke up one Saturday morning and noticed that his phone was missing. He couldn’t find it anywhere and began suspecting that he might have simply lost it as there were no signs of a robbery or anything.

This led to the next logical step—to try and call his phone. Upon calling the phone, he started hearing a ringing coming from the jungle near his house. So he followed the sound and, sure enough, found his now-dirty phone buried in a pile of palm tree leaves.

Zackryds did note that his dad saw a monkey outside their house at one moment that morning, so that might have been it, but Zack was skeptical: “I didn’t suspect a monkey would steal my phone since I’ve never seen a monkey around my house the entire time I lived here.”

Well, this one did, and it took selfies, as explained by Zackryds Rodzi, the person who’s phone this was

Image credits: Zackryds Rodzi

Zack first noticed his phone is missing when he couldn’t find it anywhere one Saturday morning

Image credits: Zackryds Rodzi

His relative also jokingly pointed out that there might be photos on the phone or some other evidence that would explain how the phone found itself in the jungle. After a glance at the gallery, he found a bunch of photos and videos of the culprit—the mischievous monkey seen by his dad earlier.

You see, there are many places around the world where monkeys live near or in urban areas such as this, but Zackryds did clarify that there were no instances of monkeys ever being seen, let alone stealing from people, in his neighborhood. It must have entered the house through his brother’s open bedroom window.

“I was shocked to find my phone misplaced and a bit broken. At first, I was mad about it, but as soon as I opened up the gallery, I started laughing. It was hilarious,” said Zackryds.

Zackryds’ dad did noticed a suspicious monkey in the morning—a rare sight in the neighborhood

Image credits: Zackryds Rodzi

Zack wound up finding the phone in the jungle behind his backyard—a bit broken as seen in the photo below because the monkey tried to chew on it several times

Image credits: Zackryds Rodzi

There were a handful of photos as well as some videos of the monkey trying to figure out how phones work. One of these videos soon found its way to the internet via Zack’s Twitter, where it went viral. Besides the various social media it found itself on, it also made headlines in the local as well as global media.

Among the myriad of various random photos and videos the monkey took, the student also noticed that there was one photo that stood out—a scenic shot of some palm tree leaves that grow in the nearby jungle. It looked quite professional—like the monkey knew what it was doing. Either that, or it was pure luck. Regardless, it’s a nice photo!

Among the many random selfies, the monkey did manage to take one professional looking photo (below)

Image credits: Zackryds Rodzi

Zack shared the now famous photos and video on Twitter where it went viral

“Next time, if a monkey wants my phone, it should just say so because it took some pretty nice photos!” commented Zackryds. Do you know the saying that if you had a million monkeys bashing at typewriters, they’d eventually write Shakespeare? Well, it only took one this time around.
We’re beginning to see a pattern here with monkeys taking selfies as British photographer David Slater had his camera picked up by a monkey named Naruto who also took a selfie. There was even an entire copyright dispute about it. See, see how mischievous monkeys can get?!

Zackryds shared with us the full video of the critter monkeying around

Click to unmute

What are your thoughts on this? Would you give your phone or camera to a monkey and see what happens? Let us know in the comment section below!

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Seth Meyers Tells Trump to F–k Himself Over Blue States Coronavirus Comment

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President Donald Trump this week sought to take credit for the government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 197,000 residents nationwide. “If you look at what we’ve done and all of the lives we’ve saved. … this was our prediction, that if we do a really good job, we’ll be at 100,000 to 240,000 deaths,” Trump said, standing in front of a pair of graphs at the White House on Wednesday. “We’re below that substantially. We’ll see where it comes out. But that would be, if we did a good job. And that’s despite the fact the blue states had tremendous death rates. If you take the blue states out we’re at a level that I don’t think anybody in the world would be at. We’re really at a very low level.”

Unsurprisingly, the callous remark left Seth Meyers feeling particularly irate. “As someone who lives in one of those states and knows people affected by this virus, I would just like to say, go fuck yourself, you rotting, soulless business ham,” Meyers said on Thursday’s episode of Late Night.

“But sure—if you just take out all the people that died, then you did a great job, dude,” Meyers added. “By the same token, if you take out all his albums, Kid Rock has had a fantastic career.”

Trump and his administration have apparently long sought to keep the national response to the coronavirus pandemic split down political lines. In July, the Washington Post reported the president was swayed to start taking the health crisis more seriously after advisors “began presenting Trump with maps and data showing spikes in coronavirus cases among ‘our people’ in Republican states.”

That same month, Vanity Fair reported exclusively that Jared Kushner, a senior White House advisor and Trump’s son-in-law, had allegedly scuttled plans for a nationwide coronavirus testing apparatus in part because of where the virus had hit. “The political folks believed that because it was going to be relegated to Democratic states, that they could blame those governors, and that would be an effective political strategy,” one source said. (The White House denied that claim.)

In public, meanwhile, Trump has frequently admonished blue states. “The Democrat-run states are the ones that are doing badly,” the president said during a town hall this week.

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A Doctor’s Emergency

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Breen tested positive for COVID-19 in late March. She spent the week of March 22 alone in her apartment, exhausted and sleeping up to 16 hours a day, according to Feist. She was in touch with family, friends, and some coworkers who were also home sick with COVID-19. “At one point approximately 20% of our physicians were out on quarantine,” Mills said of Columbia University’s emergency medicine department, which staffs four of NewYork-Presbyterian’s nine emergency departments.

When Breen’s fever subsided she waited three days, then returned to work on April 1, when local infections—and deaths—were surging. That day, Breen called her sister. “She was saying, ‘It’s like Armageddon,’” recalled Feist. The city’s hospitals were overflowing. The emergency department at the Allen, which served hard-hit communities in upper Manhattan and the Bronx, was treating about three times as many patients as its usual capacity. Breen described supply shortages and staggering deaths.

One of Breen’s colleagues described the stresses of late March and early April as the layers of an onion. Staffing was short and constantly changing. Beds were in short supply. At times, there were lines of ambulances waiting to admit patients. Portable oxygen tanks were frequently deployed. To reduce the risk of accidental exposure, some workers avoided or lived separately from their families. Each stressor layered over the next. At the core was the disease itself, and the inescapable difficulty of treating an illness while experiencing and learning about it for the first time.

On April 4, Gianos texted Breen to ask how she was doing. “I’m doing better, but dealing with the devastation in the ER, struggling a bit,” Breen replied. She had insomnia, which was unusual for her. On April 9, Breen called Feist in despair. “She was saying things to me like, ‘This is the end of my career. I can’t keep up,’” said Feist. She said she wanted to die, a remark so out of character that Feist compared it to hearing someone speak in tongues.

“I hear these stories about pilots,” Feist told me in June. “When they’re in distress, they say, ‘My plane,’ and then they’re in charge. And the cocaptain says, ‘Your plane,’ to acknowledge who’s in charge.”

Feist took control. She arranged for two friends to drive Breen, in a relay, out of the city and to Maryland. Feist drove up from Virginia to meet them. Jennifer’s husband, Corey, called Mills, who offered to check on Breen in person. “It was clear to me that she needed help,” said Mills. “She was not the same Lorna.” That evening, Jennifer Feist brought her sister to the ER at the University of Virginia Medical Center. Breen spent 11 days in the hospital’s in-patient psychiatric unit. Breen’s mother worked in that unit as a psychiatric nurse for two decades until her retirement in 2006.

While she was in the hospital, Breen worried about her career. She texted Flom, who works in human resources, for advice about taking a leave of absence. Jennifer Feist called NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University to arrange for one on Breen’s behalf. The process went smoothly, Feist said, but Breen continued to worry.

“When she got out of the hospital, she kept saying, ‘This is a career ender,’” said Feist. Her sister was catastrophizing, which can be a feature of mental illness. But even among doctors, seeking psychiatric care can carry stigma: A number of state medical licensing boards require doctors to disclose their personal psychiatric histories in ways that may not comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act—and which, Feist argues, contributes to a culture that associates seeking help with weakness. “She didn’t want anybody to know what happened,” Feist said of Breen’s mental health crisis. She contrasted that with Breen’s experience, around five years prior, with suffering and treating a pulmonary embolism: “She didn’t hesitate to tell anybody.”

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Is Jimmy Kimmel Live new tonight, September 15?

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the end of guest hosts for this summer. So expect Jimmy Kimmel to be back on the job when the show returns.

Are you disappointed by this news? Will you still tune in to see the rerun? Let us know in the comment section below.

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