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pirates of the caribbean 6: Release Date, Cast, Plot, And All latest News !!!

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All the movies of Pirates of The Caribbean was a hit on the role working atmosphere and got love from the crowds moreover. In the films, the individual of Jack Sparrow is famous around the world, which is played by Johnny Depp. The movies are invigorated through Disney’s theme park intrigue of their identical call and created by Jerry Bruckheimer. In 2017, the fifth a bit of Pirates of the Caribbean transformed into release in the theaters.

Will The Movie Happen?

Presently fans are unsure if they will find the sixth movie of Pirates of the Caribbean or now no longer. So below will be the entirety of the data about the fresh from the box new film.

So the striking data for each one of you is we can not, at this time, best get Pirates of the Caribbean 6 as a subsidiary is in the functions. Disney made excellent attestation. They might be creating the sixth element and a female-drove subsidiary film. The famous series transformed into beforehand creating series for the sixth element, anyway as a result of a few problems, it faces flaws.

The sixth film can be coordinated through a method of Joachim Rønning and made by Jerry Bruckheimer. It will allegedly reboot the franchise of their hallucination films.

Disney Fired Johnny Depp From Pirates of the Caribbean

Disney has been expressed to have dropped Depp in the Pirates franchise 4 days after Heard’s combustible 2018 opinion piece at the identical distribution, wherein she asserted that she transformed into the victim of home viciousness without seeing Depp. Depp’s attorneys guaranteed that the celebrity end from the multibillion-dollar earning company shifted due to her claims.

Disney producing pioneer Sean Bailey indicated that Depp transformed into not a part of the establishment’s predetermination plans. He educated The Hollywood Reporter, “We have to introduce new power and imperativeness.

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Kanye West Reportedly Spent Over $3.5 Million to Get on the Ballot in Just 12 States

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It’s a good thing Kanye West is a billionaire, because he’s reportedly had to put a whole lot of his own cash into funding his struggling presidential campaign.

According to TMZ, a source at Let the Voters Decide—the third-party petitioning group hired by West and led by Mark Jacoby, who was arrested on voter fraud charges and pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor in 2008—the rapper paid the group between $3.5 million and $4.5 million to have them gather signatures on his behalf in 15 states. Much of that money allegedly went to workers in Arizona, where West spent $1 million to get 93,000 signatures. But despite all the money and manpower the rapper pumped into the state, his bid to appear on the election ballot was rejected by the Arizona Supreme Court who ruled that his electors failed to file a necessary document stating their names and political parties. According to the court, any signatures gathered before the electors filed these documents are invalid. West faced similar obstacles in Ohio and Virginia, where he, according to TMZ, allegedly spent $325,000 and $300,000 respectively, only to not make it onto the ballot after each state’s Supreme Courts ruled against West. This is hardly the first time West’s campaign has faced questions of electoral fraud. 

But all of that isn’t to say that West’s financial investment in the electorate has been for naught. The reported $400,000 he spent in Kentucky and $80,000 in Iowa won him a spot on both ballots, despite two objections being filed against him in Iowa questioning him running as a no-party candidate while being a registered Republican in his home state of Wyoming and, once again, over the legitimacy of signatures on his nomination papers.

The rapper has landed himself on the ballot in 12 states total thus far, which while nowhere close to securing the 270 electoral votes he’d need to become president is just enough to inspire him to try again, apparently.

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Covid-19 Support Groups Are a Potential Research Goldmine

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Unless you or someone you know has contracted Covid-19, you’re likely just being exposed to the major coronavirus news: the vaccine trials, the updated infection prevention measures, the rising death toll. Smaller, more personal news about the pandemic tends to get drowned out on the open internet. To combat this, people who have tested positive for the virus congregate on their own, finding and founding dedicated online spaces where they post about the minutiae of a crisis more often described in giant, global arcs.

These groups are both distressing and hopeful. “I’m 21, with no prior health conditions,” writes one redditor on r/COVID19positive. “I advise anyone my age to please take all precautions. It hurts my fucking heart knowing I gave my family this horrible virus.” Commenters urge them not to be too hard on themselves, and to focus on getting well. On the Facebook group Survivor Corps, a poster has good news about an ailing loved one: His oxygen levels are finally holding steady. “This is the first improvement we have seen,” they write. “Thank you for your encouragement and your prayers.” Others mourn people lost to Covid-19 with memorial posts, list out their symptoms so people can compare and offer advice, seek help coping with the anxiety of their new or worsening diagnosis, or even just rant about anti-maskers they’ve encountered.

As infection rates continue to rise, these groups have become quite popular, drawing in hundreds of thousands of sick people seeking support. According to Jay Sinrod, founder of the Covid-19 Support Group (have it/had it) on Facebook, their members represent 102 countries from the UK to Tajikistan, and he sends a welcome message to about 300 people per day. Despite the much-heralded perils of social media groups like misinformation and harassment, for many people with Covid-19, these groups have been a source of solace. For medical researchers, they’ve been a source of data—free, easily harvestable, and ripe for analysis.

Online support groups tend to surge after any major crisis, whether it’s a terrorist attack or a natural disaster. However, according to John Naslund, who studies digital mental health at Harvard Medical School, the Covid-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented surge in online activity. “What we’re seeing is the impact of the pandemic on mental health,” Naslund says. “It’s increasingly difficult to access in-person services. Here in Boston, most hospitals have stopped outpatient mental health services. It’s interesting that they’re not considered essential.” In his research into online groups dedicated to mental health issues, he’s found such communities to be incredibly helpful for some people’s wellbeing. But “I want to be careful about saying it can work for anyone,” he cautions. “People who are still in crisis or have maybe more complex challenges need professional help.” Returns also diminish the less the group is moderated, as anybody who has ever been on social media could probably guess.

Read all of our coronavirus coverage here.

Covid-19 support groups aren’t purely Pollyanna. “I was really surprised at the trolls,” says Jean Oja, moderator of r/Covid-19Positive. “People have posted that they tested [positive] for Covid and they’re in high school, but then we check them out and none of that is true. Or when a trans girl that was sick [posted]. The hate that came from people who are transphobic—I was very much not happy with that.” Still, Oja and the rest of her team of moderators (about half of whom are teenagers) work hard to scrub all that negativity away, even now when the subreddit has grown to more than 86,000 people. Meanwhile, Sinrod’s Facebook group has cut down on noise and misinformation but limiting all posts to personal experience—no screaming headlines allowed. Yet, even after the culling of meddlers, most groups are brimming with people (mostly women) eager to give testimonials. “I check Survivor Corps daily. It is a strong community. It continues to give me positivity and ways to give back,” says Dina Ganz Traugot, a 51-year-old Covid survivor from New York City.

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Ian Somerhalder Makes the Case For Cows In ‘Kiss the Ground’ on Netflix

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Every year sees at least a few new climate change documentaries, and the latest is Kiss the Ground on Netflix, narrated by Woody Harrelson. Last year, it was HBO’s Ice on Fire, narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio. Coming, Hulu is releasing its documentary, I Am Greta, on the young climate activist Greta Thunberg. Because until people start listening, what other choice do climate activists have to keep screaming?

From directors Josh and Rebecca Tickell, Kiss The Ground zeroes in on the role soil can play as a solution to climate change. Those who have been keeping up with the issue will know that, despite the film’s promos, nothing new is revealed by the idea that soil plays an important part in “drawdown,” a climate change term coined by environmentalist Paul Hawken that refers to the act of returning the carbon that was put into the air (by things like burning oil) and putting it back into the earth. Most environmentalists see drawdown as our planet’s only path forward for solving climate change because renewable energy solutions simply aren’t enough anymore. Plants, certainly, are one method for drawing down and storing carbon, but Kiss the Ground posits that more important than planting trees is taking care of the soil they’re planted in.

Basically, soil can store a lot more carbon than plants can, but the way modern agriculture is run—especially in the United States, where agriculture is one of our biggest industries—because we keep tearing up that soil with tilling and weakening it with pesticides, GMOs, and synthetic chemicals.

The solution proposed by Kiss the Ground is a massive overhaul of the farming industry called “regenerative farming.” Most of this involves changes made by farmers and the U.S. government—like “no till” drilling, open-pasture “mob” grazing for cows, growing cover crops in the off-season, and rework of the subsidiary programs provided by the government to farmers, which currently discourages farmers from implementing theses healthy soil practices.

Kiss the Ground
Photo: Big Picture Ranch

But Kiss the Ground does touch on one major thing that viewsers as individuals can do to address climate change: Composting. Composting not only reduces waste, but it’s an easy way to get rich, sponge-y soil to farmers who need it. An interview with California governor Gavin Newsom reveals that it’s possible not to waste food—just look at San Francisco’s incredible city-wide program, where residents are actually fined for not composting.

“We incentivize people to keep things out of the black bins,” Newsom explains. “When you have nothing in the black bin, we don’t charge you. If you have a ton of stuff in the black bin, we charge you a lot. So your goal is to get it into the green and blue bins—the composting and recycling bins. You wanna move the mouse? Gotta move the cheese.” (For those of us not in San Francisco, Kiss the Ground has resources and tips for composting at home on the film’s official website.)

Kiss the Ground is scattered at times. Appearances from actors and musicians like Jason Mraz, Ian Somerhalder, Gisele Bündchen, Patricia Arquette, and David Arquette, don’t quite connect back to the thesis of the film and instead spiral it off into random directions. The exception is Somerhalder. The former Vampire Diaries star makes his segment memorable when he says, “Cows… can be good! That is one of the most controversial statements of mankind.” He’s referring to the concept of “mob-grazing” livestock, or strategically letting cows eat and defecate on certain parts of pastures to encourage growth and fertilize soil, which can help create more drawdown.  We follow Somerhalder to Zimbabwe, where he meets with Allen Savory, who has successfully used cows to revive the land. Somerhalder is earnest to the point of goofy in his reverence for the land he calls “Eden,” but it’s endearing to see how much he cares.

Unlike some documentarians who have tackled the topic, Josh and Rebecca Tickell focus almost entirely on hope for a solution, rather than despair for the damage we’ve done—because they know how many of us have already given up.

“I’ll make you a deal,” says Harrelson in his narration, smartly shown on screen in the recording studio for maximum impact. “I won’t give up. And neither should you.”

Watch Kiss the Ground on Netflix

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