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Taylor Swift’s “Betty” Is All About How Complicated Teenage Love Triangles Can Be

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Yes, 2020 has absolutely been the shittiest year ever, but there is one event coming up to provide a *bit* of a silver lining: Taylor Swift is performing at this year’s American Country Music Awards, and it’ll be her first performance on a country show in seven (7) years!!!

Despite the fact that Taylor has approximately zero ACM nominations this year, she’s going to be performing a track from her recent album—the unexpected summer smash that is folklore, duh—at the virtual ceremony. Fans might’ve expected “Cardigan” or the heartbreaking track that is “Exile” featuring Bon Iver, but Taylor chose “Betty” instead. (You know, the track where she publicly revealed the name of Blake Lively and Ryan Reynold’s third child.) But like…exactly what is the song about? Don’t worry—I am here to tell you!

During a live chat on folklore‘s release night, Taylor told fans: “There’s a collection of three songs I refer to as The Teenage Love Triangle. These three love songs explore a love triangle from all three people’s perspectives at different times in their lives.”

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The first two songs in the trio are “Cardigan,” and “August.” “Betty” is the third song to complete the teenage love triangle, and the lyrics are from the perspective of James, a 17-year-old boy who cheated on the title character Betty with another girl. ~Drama~ ensues once the teenagers all return to school, and James tries to apologize to Betty by using his immaturity as an excuse for his behavior.

Taylor went into more detail about the track on country radio, and said:

“[James] has lost the love of his life basically and doesn’t understand how to get it back. I think we all have these situations in our lives where we learn to really, really give a heartfelt apology for the first time. Everybody makes mistakes, everybody really messes up sometimes, and this is a song that I wrote from the perspective of a 17-year-old boy. I’ve always loved that in music you can kinda slip into different identities and you can sing from other people’s perspectives. So that’s what I did on this one. I named all the characters in this story after my friends’ kids…and I hope you like it!”

Without further ado, listen and learn the lyrics to “Betty” (ahead of Taylor’s ACM performance) below.

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[Verse 1]
Betty, I won’t make assumptions
About why you switched your homeroom, but
I think it’s ’cause of me
Betty, one time I was riding on my skateboard
When I passed your house
It’s like I couldn’t breathe

[Pre-Chorus]
You heard the rumors from Inez
You can’t believe a word she says
Most times, but this time it was true
The worst thing that I ever did
Was what I did to you

[Chorus]
But if I just showed up at your party
Would you have me? Would you want me?
Would you tell me to go fuck myself
Or lead me to the garden?
In the garden, would you trust me
If I told you it was just a summer thing?
I’m only seventeen, I don’t know anything
But I know I miss you

[Verse 2]
Betty, I know where it all went wrong
Your favorite song was playing
From the far side of the gym
I was nowhere to be found
I hate the crowds, you know that
Plus, I saw you dance with him

[Pre-Chorus]
You heard the rumors from Inez
You can’t believe a word she says
Most times, but this time it was true
The worst thing that I ever did
Was what I did to you

[Chorus]
But if I just showed up at your party
Would you have me? Would you want me?
Would you tell me to go fuck myself
Or lead me to the garden?
In the garden, would you trust me
If I told you it was just a summer thing?
I’m only seventeen, I don’t know anything
But I know I miss you

[Bridge]
I was walking home on broken cobblestones
Just thinking of you when she pulled up like
A figment of my worst intentions
She said “James, get in, let’s drive”
Those days turned into nights
Slept next to her, but
I dreamt of you all summer long

[Verse 3]
Betty, I’m here on your doorstep
And I planned it out for weeks now
But it’s finally sinkin’ in
Betty, right now is the last time
I can dream about what happens when
You see my face again

[Pre-Chorus]
The only thing I wanna do
Is make it up to you
So I showed up at your party
Yeah, I showed up at your party

[Chorus]
Yeah, I showed up at your party
Will you have me? Will you love me?
Will you kiss me on the porch
In front of all your stupid friends?
If you kiss me, will it be just like I dreamed it?
Will it patch your broken wings?
I’m only seventeen, I don’t know anything
But I know I miss you

[Outro]
Standing in your cardigan
Kissin’ in my car again
Stopped at a streetlight
You know I miss you

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Trump Preached White Supremacy in Minnesota, America Barely Noticed

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Last Friday, on the night that Ruth Bader Ginsburg died, Donald Trump made a campaign appearance in Bemidji, a small city in northern Minnesota. Trump played to the base instincts of an adoring crowd at the airport, where MAGA hats outnumbered facemasks by an extraordinary margin — before he slipped into a terrifying embrace of eugenics; “the racehorse theory” of human breeding; and the superiority of Minnesota genes.

Out of the gates at the evening rally, Trump stoked nativism in a state that has resettled large numbers of refugees from Somalia. “One of the most vital issues in this election is the subject of refugees,” said Trump, who has fought to block humanitarian resettlement of displaced people in the United States. “You know it perhaps better than almost anybody. Lotsa luck! Are you having a good time with your refugees?” The president then spewed bile at Ilhan Omar — herself a Somali refugee who serves Minnesota in Congress — spouting a baseless theory that she’d once married her brother (Omar calls that accusation “absurd and offensive”). Shifting topics, but not gears, Trump then addressed the racial unrest in Minneapolis that followed the homicide of George Floyd at the hands of police. Trump recounted his push to have the National Guard sent in, insisting, “You wouldn’t have Minneapolis,” if he hadn’t. He then recounted, with a sadist’s delight, how an NBC correspondent of color, Ali Veshi, got injured with a non-lethal round and was shunted aside as a phalanx of law enforcement marched through the city. “Wasn’t it a beautiful sight?” Trump asked. “It’s called law and order!”

This racist warmup complete, Trump then veered into an open endorsement of eugenics — the discredited theory that the human race can be improved with selective breeding for superior traits. The theory has an ugly history in America. And Hitler’s embrace of eugenics in Nazi Germany gave rise to the program of “race hygiene” that culminated in the extermination of millions of Jewish people and others at death camps. “You have good genes, you know that right?” Trump said to the nearly all-white crowd. “A lot of it is about the genes, isn’t it? Don’t you believe? The racehorse theory,” Trump said. “You think we’re so different? You have good genes in Minnesota.”

Watch the troubling segment below:

The Trump’s belief in eugenics has long been whispered about, but Trump has perhaps never announced it so publicly. In a Frontline film that aired in advance of the 2016 election, a Trump biographer revealed the family’s “very deep” attraction to eugenics, beginning with Trump’s father Fred, who introduced Donald to the “racehorse theory.”

NARRATOR: Fred had theories. He shared them with his kids. Donald especially liked one of them.

MICHAEL D’ANTONIO, Author, The Truth About Trump: This is a very deep part of the Trump story. The family subscribes to a race horse theory of human development, that they believe that there are superior people, and that if you put together the genes of a superior woman and a superior man, you get superior offspring.

It doesn’t take a secret decoder ring to understand what Trump was aiming at in Bemidji. The idea that white Minnesotans, like racehorses, have superior, inheritable genes is white supremacy — embraced not as a cultural construct, but as if it were based in hard science. In another moment, Trump’s remarks would have made for a front-page scandal. But on Friday, as America reeled from the death of a feminist icon whose departure threatens to accelerate a generation-long right-wing takeover of America’s highest court, as well as from a death toll in the coronavirus pandemic that has surpassed 200,000, the president’s open embrace of eugenics hardly sparked notice.

But it is time to wake up to the threat before us: We have an aspiring authoritarian president who romanticizes martial law and dreams of locking up his political opponents. Trump does not recoil from the most dangerous ideology of the 20th century, but instead celebrates it on the campaign trail in increasingly explicit terms. These may be dark times in America. But if Trump is not stopped at the ballot box in November, our democracy is in plain danger of fading to black.

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NBCUniversal Promotes Inclusion Exec Janine Jones-Clark

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Executive Janine Jones-Clark has expanded her role at NBCUniversal.

Jones-Clark has been named executive vice president, inclusion – talent and content, NBCUniversal film, television and streaming. In her new position, she will continue to oversee diversity, inclusion and equity strategies for Universal Filmed Entertainment Group under Donna Langley. She will also now reporting to Mark Lazarus, chairman, NBCUniversal television and streaming, and Pearlena Igbokwe, chairman, Universal Studio Group. Jones-Clark will work across the entire NBCU content portfolio to help develop programs that promote inclusion on and off screen.

“Janine and her team have elevated Universal’s inclusion efforts with a focus on increasing diverse storytelling and creating industry-first opportunties for underrepresented voices,” said Langley. “As a direct result of Janine’s leadership, we have more inclusive voices in our industry who are leading the way. I am thrilled that she will be uniting the content portfolios, continuing to drive progress and develop strategy for systemic change that benefits our organization and the broader media landscape.”

“We’ve admired the initiatives that Janine has cultivated with Donna at UFEG and are excited to bring her expertise to the entire NBCUniversal Entertainment portfolio,” said Lazarus and Igbokwe in a joint statement. “We are committed to supporting the next generation of changemakers and storytellers, ensuring diversity in our workforce and on our productions, and providing access to our industry through mentorship and training programs. With Janine’s expertise, and a collaborative strategy across our businesses, we can further impact our culture in a positive and meaningful way.”

Jones-Clark most recently served as head of inclusion – talent and content for UFEG, which she joined in 2017.

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2 Chainz And Big Boi Face Off On ‘Family Feud’s Season Premiere This Week

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Atlanta hip-hop mainstays 2 Chainz and Big Boi are set to face off later this week, but rather than a rap battle or a Verzuz showcase, they’ll instead compete on an episode of Family Feud. 2 Chainz posted a set of photos from the set on his Instagram today, teasing the episode’s air date later this week: Thursday, September 24. The caption reads: “I just continue growing and growing! Kudzu Toni.” He also took the opportunity to plug his upcoming album, So Help Me God, due for release later that night.

While he hasn’t released any tracklist information for the album, he has shared a couple of singles with high-profile guest appearances: “Dead Man Walking” with Future, released at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, and “Money Maker” with Lil Wayne, which Chainz later supported with an HBCU-hyping music video complete with marching bands and branded apparel. The album will also arrive just a few weeks after 2 Chainz’s 43rd birthday, for which Kanye West gifted him one of West’s strange, tank-like ATVs (what do you get for the man with a show called Most Expensivest, am I right?).

2 Chainz is also fresh off the release of his group T.R.U.’s debut album on Atlantic Records, while also working on ColleGrove 2, the followup to his successful 2016 joint album with Lil Wayne.

2 Chainz and Big Boi’s Family Feud faceoff airs Thursday at 8pm ET/PT 7pm CT on ABC.

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