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The CFDA Awards’ Most Diverse Year Ever Signals a Larger Shift in the Fashion Industry

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When the annual Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) awards took place on Monday, there was no star-studded gala like in years past. But, at an event rendered all-virtual by the ongoing pandemic, there was still plenty to celebrate—including the fact that this year’s class of winners is the most diverse in the 39-year history of the awards, with the majority of the day’s American awards going to Black designers.

This year was also the first time that three Black designers have won top CFDA awards in one year and marks only the third time that a Black designer has won American Menswear Designer of the year award. Time 100 Next honoree Kerby Jean-Raymond won the menswear award for his brand Pyer Moss, while Telfar Clemens took home American Accessory Designer of the Year and relative newcomer Christopher John Rogers won American Emerging Designer of the Year.

Fashion historian and curator Darnell-Jamal Lisby says that, while the diversity of these wins is historic for the CFDA specifically, the selection of winners is also an indicator of something changing throughout the industry: a shift in the fashion industry towards authenticity, as opposed to exclusivity.

Pandemic closures have crippled an already struggling retail world, contributing to a wave of department-store bankruptcies, and have disrupted the fashion-week cycle. Meanwhile, well before COVID-19 arrived, fast-fashion companies had disturbed the runway world by speeding copies to consumers. Coupled with a national reckoning with racial injustice, 2020 has been a moment for many to reconsider what kinds of clothing—and by extension, designers and narratives—they want to be associated with.

“This luxury bubble was bound to burst,” Lisby says. “Less and less people are trying to buy into the society that fashion has given them.”

This year’s crop of CFDA winners present an alternative vision of what fashion can offer: a unique way of interacting with an artist’s personal story. That’s something that can’t be summoned in a knock-off, and can work better when consumers are able to feel close to the designer rather than set at a distance by a runway.

“Designers like Telfar, Kerby Jean-Raymond and Christopher John Rogers built stories of who they are, where they come from, their heritage,” Lisby says, “and giving their heritage, their culture and their community a voice.”

Lisby notes that both Jean-Raymond and Clemens didn’t follow industry conventions while growing their businesses. Jean-Raymond didn’t adhere to producing collections with the bi-annual New York Fashion Week schedule, instead choosing to show once a year or when he felt like it. Clemens, who began his line 15 years ago, has also opted out of industry norms, becoming known for unisex offerings and rejecting traditional fashion week showings in favor of performance-art pieces and collaborations with unlikely partners like White Castle and Budweiser.

Lisby points especially to Clemens’ success with his Telfar “shopping bag,” which has garnered a cult following over the last few years as a relatively affordable ‘It’ bag, and as a marker of the power of re-imagining the role of fashion and whom it is for. The bag, which many have dubbed the “Bushwick Birkin,” in homage to the Brooklyn neighborhood and the classic Hermès handbag, became the talk of the Internet this summer when Clemens debuted a pre-sale program that would stop the bags from constantly selling out—thus flouting longtime laws of luxury supply and demand.

Telfar showed that “accessible merchandise that is still fashionable” can compete with more traditional luxury lines, Lisby says, and in fact major designers like Marc Jacobs have recently followed suit by offering more affordable options. “I’m thrilled that you have designers now who are stepping up to the plate and creating fashion that is accessible to the masses and allowing them to partake in enjoying style in these pleasurable ways,” he says. “I do think this is the future of fashion.”

And while Lisby’s unsure whether these CFDA wins mean real change when it comes to diversity for the fashion industry, he sees them as a reason to stay optimistic about the business.

“Within fashion, we’re at this convergence of everything that’s going on. Everything in recent years and recent months, has lead to this point where people are craving something authentic that they can buy into,” he says. “The new game is authenticity. Being true to who you are is something that resonates with people.”

Write to Cady Lang at cady.lang@timemagazine.com.

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Antebellum Creators Explain Why We Need Another Film About Slavery

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What does Antebellum, the new Janelle Monae horror film that combines real-life atrocities with a fictional narrative, add to Hollywood’s confounding record on films about slavery?

Gone With the Wind romanticized it. Django Unchained combined a brutal portrayal of real-life abuses with an over-the-top revenge narrative. Films like Roots and Twelve Years a Slave aimed for the correction and preservation of the historical record.

In the latest episode of the MovieMaker Interviews podcast, we asked Antebellum co-writers and directors Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz about what conversations they had before attempting another film dealing with slavery. On the one hand is the need to remind Americans of our shameful history. On the other is the desire to never see Black people depicted as slaves again.

“I am tired of pop-cultural artifacts that render Black people as merely Black bodies onto which the sins of this ragged country are violently mapped,” Angelica Jade Bastien wrote in her searing review of the film for Vulture. Chadwick Boseman’s agent, meanwhile, said the late actor once turned down a slavery role, saying, “We’re not going to keep perpetuating the stereotypes.”

Bush and Renz’s abbreviated answer follows, but you can listen to the full conversation on Apple or Spotify or here:

Bush says he and Renz land firmly on the side of making films that will remind Americans of our history. They quit luxury advertising jobs to make politically conscious films after the death of Trayvon Martin.

“Here’s the thing,” said Bush. “I’m not going to participate as a co-conspirator in the erasure of our own history. And I for one can completely understand where Chadwick Boseman was coming from. I hate to admit that I was incredibly uncomfortable with the idea of seeing Black people in bondage. Sitting through a slavery movie, even if it was Django Unchained, was so uncomfortable that… if I’m watching it at home, I’d have to watch it in doses. If that gives you a clear understanding of my discomfort initially with the idea of watching slavery.

But he said Antebellum is trying to reach an audience of film lovers who are also voters and citizens. He wants them to understand “how delicate the maintaining of a free democracy really is.”

“And we didn’t make this movie, and I don’t think that we’ve done anything, quite frankly, for entertainment sake. Yes, it’s crucial that we entertain thrillingly, but within that thrill, we hide the medicine of what we’re trying to say.”

He also said it’s essential that Black people, like Holocaust survivors and their ancestors, make sure the past is not forgotten.

“I liken it to our beautiful, wonderful Jewish community, and how they’re really careful to mind their narrative, and they understand that if you don’t continue to amplify the past and what happened, that before you know it, it is back at your front door again. And I think that that’s really important. I think that Black folk, by and large, we didn’t realize it, but we were actually — because we were so uncomfortable with it — we were participating in the erasure of that history.

Janelle Monae in Antebellum.

“And by erasing that history, what ends up happening is, ‘Well, then why aren’t you further as a community within this American society? Look at this community, and look at this community — what happened with you? Why aren’t you where the rest of these communities are that have that have found prosperity and achievement?

“And all you have to do is go back to the fact that the country was built on the backs of free labor and stolen bodies. And that reparations were never in place. As soon as Black folk would try to build our own communities, they would be torn down, redlined. History is chock-full of examples of how Black people have been systematically disenfranchised by a government that was designed for our failure and their success. And so it’s really important that we continue to tell those stories. … I hope that Antebellum will plant a seed in understanding that we have to remain really vigilant about our democracy.”

The Holocaust has many memorials, including Auschwitz, which includes many reminders that we can never allow it to happen again. The United States doesn’t have an equivalent, Renz notes. Some former Antebellum plantations are now tourist attractions.

“No one is throwing a wedding at Auschwitz,” he said. “But they seem to think it’s completely fine to throw a wedding at a plantation right next to cabins of enslaved people.”

Antebellum, written and directed by Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz, is now available on demand.

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The Best Bourbons Of The Year, According To The 2021 ‘Whisky Bible’

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In our desire to highlight the best bourbons for you to spend your hard-earned money on, we often look to awarding bodies and experts. You know, the sorts of folks who get paid to pick the “best bottles.” Do we believe that the experts and judges are always right in their selections? Of course not. But they do often lead to at least some cool finds for aficionados seeking out new drams to love.

For years now, the fall whiskey season has kicked off with the release of the Jim Murray Whisky Bible. The book has grown considerably over the years, with 4,500 reviews from Murray on whiskeys from all over the world. This year’s Whisky Bible added another 1,000+ bottles to the list as the world of whiskey expands even further.

Does that make Murray the be-all-and-end-all of the whiskey reviewing world? No. No one is. The industry is rapidly changing and growing with more diverse voices than ever before. Murray — while being a big part of the growth of whiskey over the last decades — is failable. In fact, he’s particularly embattled this year, over allegations of sexism. He’s also prone to palate exhaustion, just like other whisk(e)y tasters (myself included). Still, the man has tasted over 20,000 drams — that’s a whole lot of context to bring to the table.

The eight bottles of bourbon below are the ones that Jim Murray called out as “the best” going into 2021. Some of them are still fairly accessible at your local liquor store. Others are quite inaccessible — unless you’re a collector with a near limitless budget for bottles of booze. Still, it’s fun to window shop and check out what this longstanding expert has to say.

Bourbon of the Year — Stagg Jr. Barrel Proof

Buffalo Trace

ABV: 64.2%
Distillery: Buffalo Trace Distillery, Frankfort, KY (Sazerac)
Average Price: $60

The Whiskey:

This expression also won “Bourbon No Age Statement, Multiple Barrels.” So, this is a bit of a two-fer. This barrel-proof bourbon has been lauded all around the world over the last year. Don’t expect the price to stay this low for much longer.

Tasting Notes (from the distillery):

“Rich, sweet, chocolate and brown sugar flavors mingle in perfect balance with the bold rye spiciness. The boundless finish lingers with hints of cherries, cloves, and smokiness.”

Bourbon of the Year Runner Up — William Larue Weller, 2019 Release

Buffalo Trace

ABV: 64%
Distillery: Buffalo Trace Distillery, Frankfort, KY (Sazerac)
Average Price: $700

The Whiskey:

Okay, we’re already in inaccessible territory. This expression from the illustrious Buffalo Trace Antique Collection is one of the harder to find and more expensive bottles of bourbon out there. Still, the wheated bourbon is a masterpiece of craft and you can still score a similar version from Buffalo Trace’s W.L. Weller line at a much more affordable price.

Tasting Notes (from the distillery):

“Fragrant scents of caramel corn, new leather, plums, light toffee, and pipe tobacco. The palate tastes of marshmallow, salted almonds, nougat, figs, and dates. This whiskey finishes smooth, composed, and flavorfully sweet.”

Bourbon No Age Statement, Single Barrel — Elmer T. Lee, 100 Year Tribute Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Drizly

ABV: 50%
Distillery: Buffalo Trace Distillery, Frankfort, KY (Sazerac)
Average Price: $800

The Whiskey:

Buffalo Trace continues to dominate with this special release Elmer T. Lee. The bottle commemorates what would have been whiskey legend Elmer T. Lee’s 100th birthday with a special high-proof version of the standard Elmer T. Lee the distillery puts out.

Tasting Notes (from the distillery):

“The nose brings notes of clove, vanilla, and old leather. The flavor balances fruit, honey, and vanilla with a light spiciness. A long and warm finish.”

Bourbon 9-year & Under — Bib & Tucker, Small Batch Bourbon 6-Year-Old

Bib & Tucker

ABV: 46%
Distillery: Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits (Sourced)
Average Price: $52

The Whiskey:

This high-rye bourbon wins a lot of awards. The juice is over 26 percent rye and is aged in a very low charred oak barrel, which lets the spirit shine a bit brighter than the wood.

Tasting Notes (from the distillery):

“Bib & Tucker leads with a scent of strong vanilla and sweet hay. And is accented by a whiff of sandalwood and mace. With a smooth entry, the bourbon is nicely balanced with a hint of pecan pie sweetness. It fulfills the promise of its nose before evolving into a warm, rich, spicy sensation. Bib & Tucker coats the palate with a complex, yet balanced and long-lasting chestnut finish.”

Bourbon 10-12 Years — Michter’s Single Barrel 10-Years-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Michter

ABV: 47.2%
Distillery: Michter’s Distillery, Louisville, KY
Average Price: $130

The Whiskey:

This is one of those bourbons you’re still able to find for a somewhat reasonable price. That’s about to change. This bottle keeps winning big awards, getting heavy press, and is very limited each year. So, the price of this well-aged juice is going to climb higher very soon.

Tasting Notes (from UPROXX’s Expression Session):

“That oak comes through with a fresh maple syrup sweetness. There’s a sense of bourbon vanilla but it’s dialed back as the sip edges more into the bitterness of the charred oak with a rich toffee creaminess. The maple syrup, oak, and toffee carry the sip towards a warm, yet curt end.”

Bourbon 13-15 Years — Knob Creek 15-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Drizly

ABV: 50%
Distillery: Jim Beam, Clermont, KY (Beam Suntory)
Average Price: $115

The Whiskey:

Knob Creek 15 released this expression over the summer, and it’s been a hit with bourbon lovers. The juice is a 15-year-old bourbon that’s hand-selected from barrels in various parts of the rickhouse which have the exact right nuances according to the master distillers. The result is a well-aged bourbon that, while expensive, doesn’t break the bank.

Tasting Notes (from the distiller):

“After a decade and half of maturation, Knob Creek 15- Year-Old will entice the nose with delectable caramelized oak and luscious vanilla. Our bourbon will further soothe the palate with smooth caramel and toffee perfectly paired with toasted oak and light leather. Lastly, Knob Creek 15-Year-Old will finish with a warming spice joined by a slight floral bouquet.”

Bourbon 16-year & Older — Michter’s 20-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

Michters Distillery

ABV: 57.1%
Distillery: Michter’s Distillery, Louisville, KY
Average Price: $1850

The Whiskey:

This bourbon has already hit that “unattainable” level. Spending nearly $2,000 on a bottle of any booze is an investment, not a party favor. Still, this juice from Michter’s is among some of the most beloved out there (with the awards to boot).

It’s no wonder it’s reached Pappy-level prices.

Tasting Notes (from the distillery):

“Intense notes of black cherry, rich molasses, honeysuckle, roasted pecans, charred oak.”

US Micro Whiskey of the Year Single Barrel — Woodinville Straight Bourbon Whiskey Private Select

Woodinville

ABV: 45%
Distillery: Woodinville Whiskey, Woodinville, WA
Average Price: $36

The Whiskey:

Woodinville Whiskey is a local, independent, grain-to-glass whiskey distillery that wins award after award for their spirits. It’s also a small-time Pacific Northwest institution that has yet to really capture the country’s attention as a great, cornerstone whiskey maker. That’ll change soon as this stuff makes its way around the country and people fall in love with the fine bourbon made in Woodinville.

Tasting Notes (from the distillery):

“This meticulous process yields a truly hand-crafted spirit with aromas of crème brûlée and spice cabinet, as well as notes of rich caramel, dark chocolate, and vanilla bean on the palate with a sweet, lingering finish.”

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OD Chez Nous: Découvrez les candidats de la 3e maison MIXTE!

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Iiiiiiiiiiiiiih! On l’attendait et on a été plus que servis!

On doit l’avouer, on comptait les heures aujourd’hui qui nous séparaient du grand tapis rouge d’Occupation Double Chez nous. La soirée, qui a été riche en rebondissements, nous a tenus en haleine pendant une heure 30, bien scotchés à notre sofa! Alors que l’excitation était à son comble et que les candidats masculins et féminins ont été choisis par le grand public, une nouveauté de taille a pointé son bout du nez en cours de soirée: la maison MIXTE constituée de trois garçons et trois filles!

 



Eh oui, Capitaine Twist était de retour ce soir, plus en forme que jamais! Jay Du Temple nous a donc révélé ce que cachait cette fameuse troisième maison, voisine des maisons des garçons et des filles!

En plus d’habiter dans une impressionnante maison très spacieuse et luxueuse, ces 6 nouveaux candidats auront l’immense privilège d’avoir l’immunité à chaque élimination tant et aussi longtemps qu’ils restent dans la maison mixte. Enfin, ils auront également la chance de voyager en hélicoptère et en avion privé grâce à AIR OD. Sans plus attendre, voici donc les nouveaux candidats de la 3e maison:

ÉLOÏSE

Noovo – Julie Perreault


28 ans

Carignan

Propriétaire d’un institut de beauté

Forte et ambitieuse, Éloïse sait ce qu’elle veut et ce qu’elle vaut, et son indépendance a tendance à intimider les garçons… Quoique coquette aux premiers abords, elle n’hésite pas à se rouler dans la boue s’il le faut! Son prince charmant devrait être à la fois confiant, drôle, bien dans sa peau et devra être prêt à la suivre dans toutes ses aventures. Parfois possessive et jalouse en amour, gare aux filles d’OD qui oseront jouer dans ses plates-bandes!


MARJORIE

Noovo – Julie Perreault


27 ans

Sainte-Thérèse

Agente de bord

Née à Abidjan en Côte d’Ivoire, c’est toutefois dans la belle province que Marjorie a grandi. Elle parcourt le monde en exerçant un métier qui la passionne, celui d’agente de bord! Spontanée, son manque de filtre peut lui jouer de mauvais tours, mais elle assume toutes les facettes de sa forte personnalité. Séductrice hors pair, elle ne passe pas par quatre chemins pour charmer l’objet de ses désirs, et elle obtient habituellement ce qu’elle convoite!

 

MARTINE

Noovo – Julie Perreault


25 ans

Laval

Animatrice de mariage

Extravertie, expressive et créative, Martine ne rentre dans aucun moule prédéfini. Partout où elle passe, elle déplace de l’air et ne laisse personne indifférent! Charmeuse et entreprenante, lorsqu’elle trouve un gars à son goût elle passe à l’attaque… et adore déstabiliser sa proie pour mieux la séduire. Parions que les candidats d’Occupation Double ne sont pas prêts pour l’ouragan Martine!

 

RENAUD

Noovo – Julie Perreault


31 ans

Québec

Avocat

Compétitif de nature, Renaud se distingue par son ambition et sa fierté. Avocat de profession, il est passé maître dans l’art de la négociation… et il compte bien tirer profit de ce talent à Occupation Double. Après plusieurs années consacrées à son emploi, il considère que le temps est venu de rencontrer l’amour… La femme de ses rêves se trouve-t-elle à OD?

 

VINCENT

Noovo – Julie Perreault


22 ans

Laval

Représentant aux ventes

Né d’une mère costaricaine et d’un père québécois, Vincent amène sa touche latine à l’aventure! Il trouve sa passion dans la conversation et admet qu’il a parfois de la difficulté à arrêter de parler. Compétitif, leader et parfois impatient, Vincent n’a pas peur de la bisbille et ne compte pas s’en faire imposer pendant l’aventure. Les filles d’OD tomberont-elles sous son charme lorsqu’il les invitera à danser la bachata?

 

WILLIAM

Noovo – Julie Perreault


27 ans

Shawinigan

Charpentier-menuisier

Lorsqu’il ne travaille pas comme charpentier-menuisier, William exerce depuis plusieurs années le métier de barman en plus d’étudier à l’université en gestion des ressources humaines. William n’a qu’une mission en tête pour son aventure OD: créer des conflits! Grand romantique, il développera assurément des sentiments pour toutes les filles d’Occupation Double. Si par contre, il ne trouve pas l’amour pendant l’aventure, il y trouvera sans doute la célébrité qu’il souhaite acquérir.

Alors, qui est votre crush dans ces 6 p’tits nouveaux?

Pour voir l’intégralité des portraits des candidats mixtes, rendez-vous sur Noovo.ca!

Psssst! Découvrez les six gars et les six filles qui ont été officiellement pris dans l’aventure!

 

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