Connect with us

Entertainment

The Doctor Oz Show: What We Know About Its Arrival For Season 13 And 14

Published

on

Have you also watched this amazing show? Dr. Oz is the longest-running show and is loved by many fans. We have good news for all the fans as The Dr. Oz Show is renewed with two additional seasons, ll set to release for the fans in 2023. The long-running show is from the officials, and Sony Pictures Television, the maker of the show, is Zoco Productions and facilitated by Dr. Mehmet Oz. The show has been successful in making a huge fan base.

The past season of the show came recently for the fans on Monday, on the fourteenth of September 2020, and the current season seems to be a hit, and fans are loving it.

The Dr. Oz Show Has Been A Great Hit Till Now

Source: Deadline

The Dr. Oz show first came for the fans 2009, and the next year, the show was named for an aggregate of five Outstanding associated programs and granted for a sum of multiple times. The host of the show Dr. Mehmet Oz was appreciated for his work and was also awarded many awards.

The good news for the fans is The Dr. Oz show didn’t stop its production work during the Covid pandemic, nation closure, and delivered 55 amazing shows, with the most noteworthy arriving at sees 22 million in Live+7.

Here’s what The Official Of The Series Have Teased About The Show’s Renewal

We feel happy to report that The officials and Sony Pictures Television’s President Hohn Weiser said in an explanation that The Fox Television stations restoring the show The Dr. Oz for two additional seasons. Cheer up, guys we will get two more seasons of this show.

The current season of The Dr. Oz came on the fourteenth of September in the 99% of the nations that incorporate New York, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C. on Fox stations.

Entertainment

Gabourey Sidibe Says “A Few Factors” Boosted Anna Kendrick’s Career Over Hers After Both Were Oscar Noms

Published

on

By

Gabourey Sidibe and Anna Kendrick were both first time Oscar nominees at the Academy Awards in 2010. Sidibe was in the running for Best Actress thanks to her acclaimed breakout role in Lee Daniels’ Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire, while Kendrick was in contention for Best Supporting Actress along with co-star Vera Farmiga for Jason Reitman’s Up in the Air. Both of these movies were up for Best Picture and Best Director, losing to The Hurt Locker and Kathryn Bigelow. Neither Sidibe nor Kendrick won Oscars, but Sidibe says Hollywood embraced one of them more than the other.

In a new interview with Collider to mark the opening of her horror movie Antebellum, Sidibe opened up about her life and career in the 10 years following her Oscar nomination. While Sidibe is grateful to be a working actress a decade after Precious, she’s aware Hollywood didn’t open its doors to her in the same way it did for an actress like Kendrick even though they’re nearly the same age and arrived on the scene at the exact time with breakthrough Oscar nominations.

“I’ve heard the idea that I’m just lucky before,” Sidibe said. “I’ve heard that. I’m an extremely unlucky person, actually. I work really, really hard though. And no, the Hollywood seas didn’t part for me in the same way that it might have for maybe Anna Kendrick who was nominated for the first time that year as well, who then went on to star in films and television and the whole thing. The seas did not part that same way for me and I assume that there are a few factors that made that so, but I am still working 10 years later.”

Sidibe continued, “I’m still working 12 years after having filmed [‘Precious’]. I have agency. I am comfortable with who I am. I know my voice. I know what I want to say to the world. I know what I want to give to the world and what I want to give to myself. I know my artistry. And so, you know, starring in things or being on the covers of magazines, all of these things that say that I’ve ‘made it,’ everything that solidifies my position on the A-list, whatever that means, doesn’t actually mean anything to my self-worth and my sense of artistry.”

Sidibe followed Precious with a supporting role in the Universal Pictures comedy Tower Heist, co-starring Ben Stiller and Eddie Murphy, but her film career has otherwise been made up of indie projects. Sidibe found greater success on television with supporting roles in Empire, The Big C, and Ryan Murphy’s American Horror Story series. Kendrick’s post-Oscar career includes headlining Universal’s Pitch Perfect franchise, plus studio projects like Into the Woods, The Accountant, Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, and the animated Trolls series, among others.

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Yes, DC Is Already Selling Merchandise With Michael Keaton’s Batman, Because Why Not?

Published

on

By

Still, with other heroes from elsewhere in the DC multiverse expected to show up alongside these Batmen, it’s looking like The Flash will be quite the cinematic event. Furthermore, this may not be Michael Keaton’s swan song as Batman, as it was reported that he could end up serving in a “mentor capacity” in other projects, such as Batgirl. However, that tidbit of news came out before Ben Affleck’s Batman return was announced, so if plans are made to feature more of Batfleck in the DCEU, it’s unclear if that will interfere with what was being hashed out for Keaton.

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Responsibility In Art Through Black Mask Studios’ ‘Beatiful Canvas’

Published

on

By

Beautiful Canvas (Ryan K Lindsay, Sami Kivela, Triona Farrel, Ryan Ferrier) released on 2017 through Black Mask Studios, as part of the extensive efforts of this editorial to combine comics that place intriguing stories and deep social commentary. The main character is Lon, a hitwoman whose girlfriend Asia is pregnant of their baby (accidental possible trans representation or just artificial insemination, who knows!), and the conflict posses Lon with the mission of killing a child (Alex), which she refuses to go along with. Through the analogy of her future daughter as a creation, and opposed to the vision of destruction that chases her from past killings, we’re presented with two main concepts through all the book: responsibility (usually through the characters as parents or as creators) and acceptance (through the vision these characters pose over their relative others, themselves and the world, and what that reflects back into the world).

But I want to put my vision in another character of the book, far more interesting for my purpose: Milla, the villain. She’s literally a billionaire killing people and experimenting on people for the shake of “chaos as art”, with an associated director guy who records the murders she orders. There’s some anti-capitalist subtones in the message this comic gives about its main antagonist, like the “I’m a billionaire, I own you” reasoning or going as far as recording torture and murder to make “movies”, as well as showing the greater social conflict that Milla causes and that some of its victims are trying to navigate. But, to further up why I’m talking about this comic in 2020, and why it is extremely relevant in today’s discussions around art and author, I’m gonna focus on the display of violence and the real violence related to it, and what it says about responsibility around art and artists.

Starting with the content of it, art (especially cinema and the likes of Lynch or Korine, but of course also comics) has given some thought without a clear answer around if representing pain, horror and trauma by a violent light does good, with various degrees of answers from the dangers of romantifying said pain to the potentiality of being an empowerment tool for people who need to communicate their own pain. Beautiful Canvas places itself in various degrees of that conversation; it is, indeed, a gritty and violent comic, but it’s far from showing any pain for the shake of, always coming for it in light of criticism and learning, growing from violence and the struggle to not to cause pain. There’s weight to every blood drop and every harsh scene the detailed art navigates, and a core message of parenting difficulties, as well as acceptance of others as a way to create loving relationships in the world. Lon is both creator and destructor, and her responsibility with the awful things she has done mirrors the lack of responsibility of the villain, who just wants to make a show. And that starts my second point around Beautiful Canvas: that we can pinpoint horrible unknowable pain to a creator that fully intends it that way, Milla.

From 2006’s Tarana Burke #MeToo pioneer activism, to 2017’s rise of its popularity till 2020’s recent comics industry sexual abuse allegations, we are going through a shift in how we consume art and in which environments that art is generated. Of course, this has always happened (going as back as Polanski or Hitchcock’s cases of sexual assault), but 2020 has seen a rise in the recognition of violence and the demanding of responsibility like never before. We also are learning that these environments remove around a cult of personality that so often gets mixed up with the “author”, like Milla in this case.

Specifically in comics, we’ve seen how one serial abuser of women created a forum with his name on it to further impact both his art and the lives and careers of over 60 women. We are seeing every year how movie sets are filled with violence directed against everyone from actors to stunt doubles or camera specialists by personality-revered authors. For too much time too many places have centered both great minds and a great silence. And, with the recognition of the violence that was too long hidden, there is every year recognition of the violence that stories sometimes promote or perpetrate, like whitewashing, rape fetichism, harmful transphobic stereotypes and other violent stories told by authors who promote that violence.

But back to Beautiful Canvas. I personally consider it a beautiful piece of art cause it helped me shine a light and think questions on violence in the context of art and creators. Plus, the too dramatized story of a billionaire killing people to give herself the pleasure of creating chaos and a filmmaker that loves to record tortures might not be so far from what we sometimes watch on and off the screen. And it’s that deep message of the violence art can perpetrate, both in material and symbolic ways, what drives me to it.

Further on, it’s that, like me, Beautiful Canvas doesn’t have a clear solution. To get spoiler-y, Lon finally gets revenge for her abuse by Milla, but with harmful consequences for a lot of other people Milla abused (like Alex), as Milla secured her “work” by releasing further chaos. That mirrors a social preoccupation with how harm is undone. And, for this specific discussion, with ignoring pieces of art created by wide teams unaware of the harm or even affected by it, or not learning from something by censoring it. These are all open questions, and everyone must do their own answer, but sometimes doing it with a comic helps, instead of burdening it.

Responsibility In Art Through Black Mask Studios’ ‘Beatiful Canvas’

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 NewsLagoon | All Content Rights Reserved.