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The UN has worked tirelessly to end wars and prevent conflicts. COVID-19 could make it harder. We could all use more shine this back-to-school season Two-thirds of Americans say quarantine has made them a better person The organization that helped ban plastic bags in Bali — and beyond These two are now engaged after he answered her dating advice question with the ‘worst’ answer A transexual-anarchist-Satanist won the GOP sheriff nomination in a N.H. county

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the “scourge of war” so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here’s a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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Supergirl Ending With Season 6

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Supergirl‘s tenure as the resident defender of National City is reaching an unexpectedly early conclusion. The upcoming sixth season of The CW’s superhero series will be its last, TVLine has learned.

Production on Supergirl‘s 20-episode final season is slated to begin later this month; the show’s creative team is already developing storylines. (Click here for a refresher on where things left off in Season 5.)

Melissa Benoist stars as Supergirl‘s titular Kryptonian, leading a cast that includes Chyler Leigh, Katie McGrath, Jesse Rath, Nicole Maines, Andrea Brooks, Azie Tesfai, Julie Gonzalo, Staz Nair and David Harewood. Previous stars included Mehcad Brooks, Jeremy Jordan, Chris Wood, Floriana Lima, Odette Annable and Calista Flockhart.

(Click here for Benoist’s reaction to the show’s conclusion.)

Supergirl‘s freshman run, which premiered in October 2015 on CBS, averaged 7.7 million total viewers and a 1.7 demo rating (in Live+Same Day numbers). Upon being relocated for Season 2, it slipped to a CW-typical 2.4 mil/0.7. With its most recent, fifth season, the Arrowverse series averaged 840,000 total viewers and a 0.22 demo rating, down a good (but not) 30 percent from Season 4.

Supergirl is part of the newly re-minted “CWverse,” meaning it exists in the same universe as Arrow, The Flash, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow, Black Lightning, Batwoman and recent DC Universe transplant Stargirl. New seasons of those shows — except Arrow, of course, which wrapped its eight-season run earlier this year — will premiere on The CW sometime in 2021.

TVLine’s Broadcast-TV Renewal Scorecard has been updated to reflect Supergirl‘s impending conclusion. Are you prepared to say goodbye to your friends (and their enemies) in National City? Drop a comment with your reaction, as well as your hopes for the show’s final season, below.

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Why American Horror Story fans hated Apocalypse’s finale

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Although the bad guy almost always loses on television, fans were expecting a more gratifying death to quite possibly the strongest creature on AHS. Other Reddit users mentioned that Michael’s death is also anticlimactic. The witches go back to his weakest point to kill him as opposed to a fair showdown between Michael and newly minted Supreme Mallory (Billie Lourd). The point is, Michael can’t be beaten at the top of his game, as is the case with most characters who are capable of bringing on the bloody apocalypse. This is why Mallory has to take on a much weaker form of the antichrist. Otherwise, she loses.

Another common complaint is that Apocalypse undid plot lines from previous seasons. As the Redditors collectively pondered, how come the antichrist is still born regardless of everything the witches go through to stop Michael? Doesn’t this undermine everything that happens in Apocalypse?

Outpost 3 teens Emily (Ash Santos) and Timothy (Kyle Allen) also reappear after being off the grid for what seemed like ages. In the new timeline, since the undoing of Michael’s wrath in the apocalyptic world, Emily and Timothy meet up by chance and sire a kid who eventually kills a babysitter. This kid is somehow the new supposed son of Satan. Apparently, their DNA really was special. Alas, the audience is just supposed to accept that these two are capable of making Baby Satan — even though the audience spent an entire season being told how otherworldly powerful Michael is? As usual, the season’s time travel component blurred the already bloody waters of a season that was otherwise great — but could have been so much better. 

Twists and turns are staples of the horror genre. As far as some fans are concerned, however, Ryan Murphy’s aging anthology series may have gone a bit too far with this one.

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‘The Daily Show’ Offers a COVID-Era Staycation As Bad as a Real Airport

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In a fun gag parodying one of the weirder COVID-19-era trends, “The Daily Show” on Tuesday rolled an ad for a new service promising to bring a crucial vacation experience to people still quarantining in their homes. Specifically, the experience of just how much it sucks to deal with airports.

So for those catching up, what inspired the gag was a story about what airlines call “scenic flights” but are being colloquially called “flights to nowhere,” where people buy airline tickets for lengthy flights with no destination. These flights, which are supposedly chock full of COVID-19 safety precautions, actually depart from the airport and then, several hours later, returns all passengers back to their point of departure. The idea is that people can have the experience of taking a vacation without actually taking one and increasing their risk of becoming a pandemic statistic.

You can probably spot a few problems with the idea, but as Roy Wood Jr. noted Tuesday, one of the biggest is that the people are basically boiling a vacation down to the worst part of it — the part involving airports.

In the clip, Wood plays Leo Deblin, whose fictional service, “Leo Deblin’s Airport-at-Home,” which promises to give customers “all the stress, frustration and boredom of flying, in your house.”

Among the amenities offered, Wood’s Deblin promises to “inspect your suitcase, and throw half of it out,” take shampoo away from kids, and serve “the world’s soggiest sandwich,” which of course costs $40.00.

Wood also promises to “take up every outlet, so you can’t charge your phone,” replace Netflix with “CNN on mute,” and return people’s luggage “with a weird wet spot on it,” which he adds “could be blood.”

Watch the whole clip above.

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